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Free head and neck cancer screening April 27

Apr. 18, 2012, 4:22 PM

(Vanderbilt University)

To help catch head and neck cancer in its earliest stages there will be free cancer screenings at Vanderbilt, Meharry and the Nashville VA on Friday, April 27.

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, Meharry Medical College, the Tennessee chapter of the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance and the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System are coordinating the screenings.

The annual screening and educational events are open to the public, and no appointment is necessary.

Lumps, bumps or sore spots on the head or neck or discomfort in the mouth and throat may be early symptoms of head and neck cancer. Other symptoms include difficulty swallowing, hoarseness or a change in the voice.

The free head and neck cancer screening exams take only a few minutes and are painless.

The screening sessions will be available from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 27 at:

  • The Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center’s Odess Head & Neck Surgery Clinic, 7209 Medical Center East-South Tower, 1215 21st Ave. South (free parking in the East Garage off Medical Center Drive)
  • The VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System’s Surgical Clinic No. 1-ENT Clinic, first floor, 1310 24th Ave. South
  • Meharry Medical College School of Dentistry at the corner of Meharry Boulevard and Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Boulevard.

No appointments are necessary. For more information, contact Michelle Pham at Vanderbilt, (615) 936-4896; Edwin Emerson at the VA, (615) 873-8357; or Dana Marshall at Meharry, (615) 327-6549.

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