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Nettles named to state developmental disabilities council

Mar. 6, 2014, 9:38 AM

Arie Nettles, Ph.D., associate professor of Clinical Pediatrics in the Division of Developmental Medicine, has been appointed to the Statewide Planning and Policy Council of the Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD).

Arie Nettles, Ph.D.

Nettles, who is also director of the Office of Inclusion and Health Equity (OIHE) for the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, will serve a three-year term, ending in January 2017.

The council offers ideas, research and recommendations to help DIDD and the State improve the quality of life for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Nettles joined the Vanderbilt Center for Child Development (CCD) as a licensed psychologist in Pediatrics in 2004, providing psychological and diagnostic services to children and families who are faced with autism, behavioral and emotional difficulties, developmental delay and mental retardation.

Later in 2011, Nettles was also named director of OIHE, which works to meet the unique and specific needs of patients and families from a rich array of diverse cultures and backgrounds through several initiatives that address health equity and inclusion.

Previously, she was an assistant professor and assistant research scientist of Education in the School of Education and assistant clinical professor of Pediatric Psychology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. She also was an assistant professor of Educational Psychology and Counseling at the University of Tennessee.

Nettles received her doctoral degree in psychology from the George Peabody College at Vanderbilt University.

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