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Bringing Cancer to Light: Radiology’s invisible energies play lead role in cancer care

Jul. 7, 2014, 1:08 PM

It all started with a faint glow.

It was November 1895, and the German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen was experimenting with an early cathode ray tube—a vacuum tube with a contained electric current. During his experiments he noticed an odd fluorescence in crystals on a nearby table. Surprisingly, the glow continued even when he covered the tube with heavy black paper.

Roentgen had discovered X-rays.

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Originally published in Momentum

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