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Dalley’s contributions to anatomical sciences recognized

Jun. 4, 2015, 8:38 AM

Arthur Dalley, Ph.D., professor of Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt, recently received the highest award for human anatomy education in the anatomical sciences during the 2015 Experimental Biology meeting in Boston.

Arthur Dalley, Ph.D.

Soon after accepting the Henry Gray/Elsevier Distinguished Educator Award Medal for 2015, he was also named a fellow of the American Association of Anatomists.

The rank of fellow is designed to honor distinguished members who have demonstrated excellence in science in their overall contributions to the anatomical sciences.

“I was unaware that the rank of fellow would be a bonus for receiving the Henry Gray Award,” said Dalley, who discovered he would be in the group receiving rank while reading the awards banquet program.

“Having been a member of the AAA for more than 40 years, most of my living career heroes have been among those recognized and honored by the AAA for their distinguished careers,” Dalley added.

Dalley, also professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, is the former director of Medical Gross Anatomy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He has been an anatomy educator for 40 years.

Dalley, co-author of several anatomy textbooks, joined the Vanderbilt faculty in 1998. He previously served on the faculty at Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha for 24 years. He earned his Ph.D. and B.S. from the University of Utah.

His book, “Clinically-Oriented Anatomy,” was adopted for use at 90 percent of medical schools in its first edition. He also helped edit one of the world’s top-selling anatomical atlases, “Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy,” (named Illustrated Book of 2013 by the British Medical Association), co-authored several anatomical software programs, and spent a year revising and relocating the definitions of some 20,000 anatomical terms for the 26th edition of “Stedman’s Medical Dictionary.”

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