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Gannon to chair ADA science session planning committee

May. 5, 2016, 9:37 AM

Maureen Gannon, Ph.D., associate professor of Medicine, has been appointed chair of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Scientific Session planning committee.

She will lead a 30-member committee that will plan the association’s next two Scientific Sessions in 2017 and 2018. This year’s session, which begins in New Orleans in June, is expected to attract 18,000 diabetes specialists and researchers from around the world.

“It has been my great pleasure to be a part of the dedicated group of clinicians, physician scientists and basic scientists planning the prestigious ADA Scientific Sessions for the past three years,” said Gannon, also associate professor of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and Cell and Developmental Biology.

“I am very excited about the opportunity to lead this group, working with the outstanding leadership team at the ADA, and to have a positive impact on the content of upcoming Scientific Sessions,” she said.

Gannon is nationally known for her research on the molecular and cell biology of pancreas development and function. She received her Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Cornell University, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell and Vanderbilt before joining the Vanderbilt faculty in 2001.

Last year Gannon was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for “distinguished research and mentoring in pancreas development and islet biology, distinguished service in diabetes awareness and outreach and commitment to science education and training.”

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