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Colon cancer awareness event set for Aug. 5

Jul. 25, 2016, 12:51 PM

For some people cancer, especially colon cancer, is a persistent and potentially deadly visitor affecting family members from one generation to the next. Individuals who have a parent, sibling or child diagnosed with colon cancer have double the risk of developing the disease.

But not all colon cancer is caused by hereditary factors.

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), in partnership with the Colon Cancer Alliance, is hosting a free seminar to educate the public about risk factors associated with the disease.

“Fight Colon Cancer — Know Your Hereditary Risk” will be held Friday, Aug. 5, 6-7:30 p.m., at VICC in the 8th floor conference center of the Preston Research Building, 2220 Pierce Ave.

Cancer experts from the Vanderbilt Hereditary Cancer Program (www.vanderbilthealth.com/cancer/39205) will explain how to spot the high-risk factors in a family tree, including other types of cancer that may indicate a potentially hereditary cancer syndrome. They will also discuss genetic testing, including advice about who may or may not benefit.

The Vanderbilt Hereditary Cancer Program, led by Georgia Wiesner, M.D., M.S., is a recipient of a Blue Hope grant from the Colon Cancer Alliance to support the cost of colon cancer genetic testing for families in need.

Dinner will be served during the event and free parking is available in the South Garage or the Central Garage.

Space is limited and guests are asked to reserve a seat by Aug. 3. For more information or to register, visit www.fightcoloncancer-nashville.eventbrite.com or call 615-322-9799.

The event is being held in conjunction with the 2016 Nashville Colon Cancer Alliance Undy Run/Walk to be held Saturday, Aug. 6. For details, visit www.ccalliance.org/undy-runwalk.

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