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Symposium honors Casagrande’s career

Dec. 1, 2016, 9:38 AM

Vivien Casagrande, Ph.D., poses with colleagues at the recent symposium honoring her contributions to science. With her, from left, are Rene Marois, Ph.D., M.S., Ian Macara, Ph.D., Mark Wallace, Ph.D., and David Calkins, Ph.D. (photo by Anne Rayner)
Vivien Casagrande, Ph.D., poses with colleagues at the recent symposium honoring her contributions to science. With her, from left, are Rene Marois, Ph.D., M.S., Ian Macara, Ph.D., Mark Wallace, Ph.D., and David Calkins, Ph.D. (photo by Anne Rayner)

Colleagues of Vivien Casagrande, Ph.D., celebrated her distinguished career in the visual sciences with a “Lifetime of Vision” symposium Nov. 18 in Biological Sciences/Medical Research Building III.

Casagrande, who joined the Vanderbilt University faculty in 1975, is professor of Cell & Developmental Biology, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Psychology and a Vanderbilt Kennedy Center investigator. Her studies, which have mapped the visual brain circuitry in a variety of species, have advanced understanding of the development and evolution of the mammalian visual system.

A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Association of Anatomists, Casagrande has received a Chancellor’s Award for her research and an Outstanding Teacher award from the Vanderbilt Brain Institute.

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