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Rush honored by Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

May. 11, 2017, 9:59 AM

The Middle Tennessee Chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) recently named Meg Rush, M.D., as the 2017 JDRF Living & Giving Honoree.

Meg Rush, M.D.

This honor is awarded annually to an individual for their impact on and contributions to the type 1 diabetes community in Middle Tennessee.

Rush, Chief of Staff and Executive Medical Director of Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, was recognized at the recent 17th Annual Promise Gala.

“Dr. Rush has been a wonderful partner and advocate for JDRF,” said Mary Lyn Schuh, executive director of the JDRF Middle Tennessee Chapter. “Not only does she have a deep understanding of the needs of a family when their child is diagnosed with a chronic illness, she has also experienced first-hand the concern and determination that every parent feels when their child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. We are so pleased to be able to recognize her contributions to our cause with this award.”

Rush has been a clinician and physician-leader of Children’s Hospital for 33 years. Also a mother of two daughters, her oldest daughter, 26, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 3.

“I am truly humbled to receive this award,” Rush said. “I often say ‘it takes a village’ to support a child and family living with chronic diseases like type I diabetes. I mostly consider myself in the ‘supporting actress’ role. Personally, I have enabled my eldest daughter to lead an active and full life since her diagnosis with type I diabetes 23 years ago. And I have also been so fortunate to help champion the efforts of our team of diabetes clinicians, educators and researchers over many years here at Vanderbilt. Their daily efforts not only benefited my daughter and our family but so many others across our middle Tennessee region.

“It is a true privilege to be a part of their efforts and those of the JDRF in the goal to take type I to ‘type none.’”

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