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VICC experts to discuss high risk breast cancer at free seminar June 6

May. 26, 2017, 10:42 AM

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), in collaboration with the Hereditary Cancer Program and the Vanderbilt Breast Center, will host a free seminar, “Are You at High Risk for Breast Cancer?”

This interactive program to be held Tuesday, June 6, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m., at Vanderbilt Health One Hundred Oaks, 719 Thompson Lane, is open to anyone identified as high risk for developing breast cancer as well as other patients, families and health care professionals. Dinner will be provided and parking is free.

The seminar will feature expert speakers who will provide an update on the latest information about hereditary and lifestyle factors that affect cancer risk, plus screening recommendations for early detection of the disease. They also will discuss emotional well-being for people who are at increased risk of developing breast cancer.

More than 252,000 women and men are expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Participants for the Vanderbilt-hosted event are asked to park near the T.J. Maxx store and enter the building through the “D” entrance. The seminar will be held in the First Floor Conference Room under the escalators.

Seating is limited and participants can register in advance by visiting www.viccbreastcancerhighrisk.eventbrite.com.  For questions or to register by phone, please call (615) 322-9799.

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