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Kidney cancer patient, survivor event set for Sept. 9

Aug. 17, 2017, 9:08 AM

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) will sponsor an educational conference for kidney cancer patients, survivors and family members Saturday, Sept. 9, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m., in the Preston Research Building, Suite 898.

The free seminar will be hosted by W. Kimryn Rathmell, M.D., Ph.D., Cornelius A. Craig Professor of Medicine and director of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at VICC, and Carrie Kononsky, CEO and president of the Kidney Cancer Association.

“We are inviting the community of kidney cancer patients and their supporters to attend this event, which will provide the latest information about new renal cell cancer therapies, as well as coping strategies for patients and families,” Rathmell said. “At Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center we have a group of physicians and clinical staff with extensive experience in treating these patients and we want to share our expertise with this special group of patients and survivors.”

During the conference Kelvin Moses, M.D., Ph.D., will discuss the newest surgical techniques; Scott Haake, M.D., will describe the genomic landscape in renal cell carcinoma; Rose Vick, MSN, will share coping skills and strategies; M. Rachel McDowell, ACNP-BC, will review pain management issues; and Machelle Osborne will discuss patient financial services available at VICC.

Special guest Hans Hammers, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, will discuss the importance of kidney cancer advocacy.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided for registered participants. To register, go here. For more information call 615-875-9731.

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