Skip to main content

A new target for neuroblastoma

Feb. 14, 2018, 8:00 AM

Neuroblastoma — a cancer that starts in nerve tissue outside of the brain — is the third most common cancer in children and accounts for about 15 percent of pediatric cancer-related deaths.

Sirtuins (SIRTs), a family of proteins with roles in metabolism, aging and genomic stability, have been linked to various cancers, but their role in neuroblastoma has not been explored.

Dai Chung, MD, and colleagues found that a non-specific SIRT inhibitor reduced the growth rate of cultured neuroblastoma cells and induced the formation of neurite-like structures consistent with neuronal differentiation (maturation). Using a genetic strategy to knock down specific SIRTs, they discovered that SIRT6 promotes neuroblastoma cell growth and represses differentiation. SIRT6 expression was reduced in differentiated human neuroblastoma samples and in cultured neuroblastoma cells that were induced to differentiate using retinoic acid.

The findings, reported in the February issue of Anticancer Research, highlight the oncogenic properties of SIRT6 in neuroblastoma and suggest SIRT6 as a target for new therapeutics for neuroblastoma.

This research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (DK061470) and Rally Foundation for Cancer Research.

Send suggestions for articles to highlight in Aliquots and any other feedback about the column to aliquots@vanderbilt.edu

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

more