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Cancer Center’s annual scientific retreat set for May 3

Apr. 18, 2018, 10:38 AM

The potential link between the body’s microbiome and cancer is the topic of this year’s Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) Scientific Retreat. The annual event, which features leading cancer investigators from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and several prominent universities will be held Thursday, May 3, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Vanderbilt Student Life Center.

The event is free and open to the public.

The microbiome describes all of the microorganisms and the genetic material of these microorganisms in the human body and the surrounding environment.

Featured speakers will include:

  • Giorgio Trinchieri, MD, National Institutes of Health Distinguished Investigator and director of the Cancer and Inflammation Program in the Center for Cancer Research at the NCI, who will discuss the microbiome in carcinogenesis and cancer therapy;
  • Gary Wu, MD, Ferdinand G. Weisbrod Chair in Gastroenterology and co-director of the PennCHOP Microbiome Program at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, who will examine the role of diet and the gut microbiome in health and disease;
  • Cynthia Sears, MD, professor of Medicine, Oncology and Molecular Microbiology, and Immunology at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who will explain her research on colon cancer, biofilms and microbes; and
  • Christian Jobin, PhD, Gatorade Trust Professor of Medicine and program leader for Cancer Microbiota and Host Response in the Division of Gastroenterology, University of Florida, who will discuss the relationship between intestinal microbiota and cancer.

“We are excited to welcome these distinguished investigators and to learn more about their leading-edge research in this burgeoning field of study,” said Ann Richmond, PhD, Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and associate director for Research Education, who is organizing the VICC retreat.

In addition to the oral presentations, there will be a research competition. Cancer investigators are encouraged to submit research abstracts and cash prizes will be awarded to the top three winners in each group.

The VICC Postdoctoral Student of the Year and the Graduate Student of the Year also will be announced during the event.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided for those who register in advance. Seating is limited.

For details and to register for the event, visit www.vicc.org/retreat.

 

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