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Lecture in honor of first African-American resident, Harold Jordan, to be Feb. 8

Feb. 5, 2019, 11:19 AM

Harold Jordan, MD

The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences has established a named lecture, the Dr. Harold Jordan Diversity and Inclusion Lecture, named after the first African-American resident at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

The first speaker in the new series will be Lloyda Williamson, MD, professor and chair of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Meharry Medical College. Williamson’s talk, “Increasing the Number of Black Psychiatrists: A Call for Action to All Psychiatrists,” will take place at noon on Friday Feb. 8 in the Luton Lecture Hall at Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital.

The talk will be broadcast live and can be viewed at https://www.vumc.org/psychiatry/grand-rounds. CME credit will be available at https://vumc.cloud-cme.com.

Lloyda Williamson, MD

Harold Jordan, MD was the first African-American resident physician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, completing a General Psychiatry residency between 1964 and 1967. Following the 2017 publication of articles in VUMC Voice and Vanderbilt Medicine about his groundbreaking role, the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences formed a Diversity and Inclusion Committee which, in turn, decided to institute an annual named lecture in Jordan’s honor celebrating diversity and inclusion.

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