Skip to main content

Author: Craig Boerner

VUMC study finds helping patients breathe during intubation prevents life-threatening complications

Feb. 18, 2019—Thousands of Americans die each year during a dangerous two-minute procedure to insert a breathing tube. Now a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) is showing that using bag-mask ventilation, squeezing air from a bag into the mouth for 60 seconds to help patients’ breathing, improves outcomes and could potentially save lives.

Read more


Society of Urologic Oncology honors Barocas’ contributions

Jan. 31, 2019—Daniel Barocas, MD, MPH, associate professor of Urology, is being recognized with a national award from the Society of Urologic Oncology (SUO) for his efforts to develop urologic cancer quality measures.

Read more


Nasal whooping cough vaccine trial underway at Vanderbilt

Jan. 28, 2019—Vanderbilt vaccine researchers are enrolling adult volunteers in a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored Phase II clinical trial that will study a next generation pertussis vaccine that may protect people from whooping cough.

Read more


Therapy aims to reduce prostate cancer treatment side effects

Dec. 13, 2018—Vanderbilt urologic surgeons are offering an alternative therapy for prostate cancer patients considered to be low-to-intermediate risk, a middle ground between active surveillance and aggressive therapy.

Read more


High-dose antipsychotics place children at increased risk of unexpected death

Dec. 12, 2018—Children and young adults without psychosis who are prescribed high-dose antipsychotic medications are at increased risk of unexpected death, despite the availability of other medications to treat their conditions, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in JAMA Psychiatry. Unexpected death includes deaths due to unintentional drug overdose or cardiovascular/metabolic causes.

Read more


Schaffner honored by Infectious Diseases Society of America

Dec. 6, 2018—William Schaffner, MD, professor of Preventive Medicine in the Department of Health Policy and professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, is the recipient of the 2018 D.A. Henderson Award for Outstanding Contributions to Public Health.

Read more


Low health literacy associated with early death for cardiovascular patients

Nov. 7, 2018—Patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event are more likely to die within one year if they have low health literacy, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released this week in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Read more


Team seeks to identify immune response to influenza

Nov. 1, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers, as part of the International Human Vaccines Project, are searching for the key to lasting protection against influenza by examining naturally protecting cells found in bone marrow.

Read more


Antipsychotics ineffective for treating ICU delirium: study

Oct. 22, 2018—Critically ill patients are not benefiting from antipsychotic medications that have been used to treat delirium in intensive care units (ICUs) for more than four decades, according to a study released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Read more


Vanderbilt implants Tennessee’s first artificial heart

Sep. 27, 2018—by Craig Boerner Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Cardiac Surgery Team performed Tennessee’s first total artificial heart implantation Wednesday, Sept. 26, on a 56-year-old man with congestive heart failure.  The team used a SynCardia Total Artificial Heart, a mechanical solution for a patient’s failing heart, whereby surgeons completely remove the patient’s heart and replace it with...

Read more


Fibromyalgia: More doctor visits mean fewer suicide attempts

Sep. 20, 2018—Fibromyalgia patients who regularly visit their physicians are much less likely to attempt suicide than those who do not, according to a new Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more


Study finds behavioral changes insufficient at preventing early childhood obesity

Aug. 9, 2018—Young children and their families in poor communities were able to make some achievable and sustainable behavioral changes during the longest and largest obesity prevention intervention ever conducted. But, in the end, the results were insufficient to prevent early childhood obesity.

Read more


Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

A diagnosis of cancer at any age is tragic, but during the adolescent and young adult years, it’s especially complicated.

Hope

A diagnosis of cancer at any age is tragic, but during the adolescent and young adult years, it’s especially complicated.

Karen Dyer Young cares for patients and members of the Dayani Center who have or are recovering from cancer or a stem cell transplant.

Momentum

Karen Dyer Young cares for patients and members of the Dayani Center who have or are recovering from cancer or a stem cell transplant.

more