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Smart underwear prevents back stress with just a tap

Aug. 1, 2017—"Performance-boosting super suit" hidden under clothing can be activated by a double tap to save users' backs.

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Early experience with federal health coverage suggests how future Medicaid reforms may work

Feb. 1, 2017—Proposed Medicaid reforms are similar to the capped federal financing system in place during the '50s and early '60s, when states generally reimbursed a much smaller proportion of health care for the needy.

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VUMC study finds statins do not ease kidney injury following cardiac surgery

Feb. 23, 2016—Among doctors, it is widely believed that a class of drugs called statins, which are used to lower cholesterol, might help patients tolerate the stress of cardiac surgery. Not so, according to a five-year, placebo-controlled, double-blinded randomized clinical trial conducted at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association....

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VU Inside: Dr. William Fissell’s Artificial Kidney

Feb. 12, 2016—Vanderbilt University Medical Center nephrologist and Associate Professor of Medicine Dr. William Fissell IV is making major progress on a first-of-its kind device to free kidney patients from dialysis. He is building an artificial implantable kidney with microchip filters and living kidney cells that will be powered by a patient’s own heart.

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Promising Research Rapidly Tests Chemo Effectiveness Before Cancer Treatment

Feb. 10, 2016—Everyone knows someone with breast cancer who is going through toxic chemotherapy. But what if you could find out within three days, instead of months, what chemo works best on your tumor? A Vanderbilt researcher is developing a new ‘tumor- in-a-dish’ technique that may do just that.

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Higher cigarette taxes linked to fewer infant deaths

Dec. 1, 2015—Higher taxes and prices for cigarettes are strongly associated with lower infant mortality rates in the United States, according to a new study from Vanderbilt University and the University of Michigan released Dec. 1 in the journal Pediatrics.

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Two Ebola Survivors’ Blood Could Help Vanderbilt Researchers Find A Treatment

Oct. 19, 2015—Vanderbilt researchers could be one step closer to finding a way to fight the deadly Ebola virus – thanks to two Ebola victims from Nigeria, who faced death and survived. Vanderbilt researchers developed a unique method of isolating potent Ebola-fighting antibodies from survivors’ blood and they believe these newest potent antibody samples are an important...

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Vanderbilt researchers promise #WeWillNotGiveUp until diseases are cured!

Aug. 17, 2015—In the latest VUCast: Learn how researchers behind a life-saving social media campaign are promising #WeWillNotGiveUp; find out how your brain "sees" in the dark; and hear about the No. 1 ranking that's making Vanderbilt students happy. Watch now!

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Tiny mechanical wrist gives new dexterity to needlescopic surgery

Jul. 23, 2015—VIDEO» A Vanderbilt research team has successfully created a mechanical wrist less than 1/16th of an inch thick -- small enough to use in needlescopic surgery, the smallest form of minimally invasive surgery.

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Vanderbilt researchers develop potential treatment to fight mosquito-borne chikungunya virus

Jul. 8, 2015—In late 2013 the Caribbean had its first case of the mosquito-borne chikungunya virus. Today there have been almost 1.2 million cases in 44 countries or territories, including 177 cases in 31 U.S. States.

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Homeward Bound: A Nurse-Parent Partnership

Jan. 23, 2015—Taking your child home from the hospital after surgery can be very difficult and scary, trying to meet their many medical needs. But Homeward Bound, a program developed by nurses at Vanderbilt, helps make that transition easier as Barb Cramer reports.

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Vanderbilt researchers isolate Ebola-fighting human antibodies for possible treatment

Oct. 28, 2014—Vanderbilt University researchers have isolated Ebola-fighting human antibodies – the first of their kind – that could lead to a new treatment for the deadly virus.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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