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bacteria Archives

A probiotic treatment for obesity?

Aug. 8, 2019—Engineered bacteria that produce beneficial compounds — and that could potentially be administered in foods like yogurt — may be a future treatment for obesity and other chronic diseases.

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Mouth microbes and colorectal cancer

Jun. 6, 2019—Microbial species in the mouth could be playing a role in colorectal cancer development, according to new research from epidemiologists at VUMC.

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How bugs overcome host defenses

Apr. 11, 2019—Vanderbilt researchers led by Eric Skaar are probing the mechanisms bacteria use when faced with nutrient starvation — a host defense strategy called “nutritional immunity.”

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Lighting up iron levels

Jan. 11, 2018—A new probe enables iron imaging in living animals, providing a unique tool for studying iron’s contributions to health and disease.

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Predicting the infection response

Apr. 19, 2017—Vanderbilt investigators are probing the response to a bacterial toxin as a clinical assessment of immune function.

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Bacterial signaling systems

Feb. 3, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers have identified a unique example of communication between bacterial signaling systems, which may have relevance for antibiotic resistance.

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Slight chemical change may improve TB treatments: study

Feb. 11, 2016—One small chemical change to an existing antibacterial drug results in a compound that is more effective against its target enzyme in tuberculosis, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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Immune tolerance in endothelial cells

Jan. 7, 2016—Inducing “tolerance” to bacterial toxins in the endothelial cells that line blood vessels may offer a new approach for preventing the negative consequences of sepsis.

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Detect and defend against pathogens

Nov. 4, 2015—Understanding factors, such as the receptor TLR9, that detect and defend against pathogens may lead to therapeutic approaches that promote an effective immune response to treat infections.

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Study identifies C. diff toxin receptor, suggests new treatment approaches

Jun. 4, 2015—Vanderbilt University investigators have identified a cellular receptor for a toxin from Clostridium difficile (“C. diff”) — the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States.

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Preventing early pregnancy complications

May. 20, 2015—The enzyme alkaline phosphatase may provide a new therapeutic option for women at high risk of pregnancy complications due to bacterial toxin exposure.

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Bacterial secretion machinery: 3-D view

Dec. 11, 2014—New structural findings reveal how "gatekeeper" proteins participate in the secretion systems bacteria use to infect host cells.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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