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biomedical engineering Archives

Gore, King elected to 2019 IAMBE Class of Fellows

May. 22, 2019—John Gore, PhD, and Michael King, PhD, were recently elected to the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering (IAMBE) 2019 Class of Fellows in recognition of their contributions in the field of medical and biological engineering.

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Skin diseases study uses crowdsourcing to gather data

Feb. 21, 2019—In 1906, English statistician Francis Galton happened to visit a livestock fair where fairgoers were invited to guess the dressed weight of an ox scheduled for imminent slaughter. Some 800 attendees took part and afterwards Galton got hold of the contest data.

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Vanderbilt study suggests way to prevent rare lung disease

Nov. 15, 2018—Research by Vanderbilt scientists suggests that it may be possible to prevent or even reverse pulmonary arterial hypertension, a rare, progressive disease characterized by narrowing of and high blood pressure in the small arteries of the lungs.

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Smith named associate director of the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science

Oct. 4, 2018—Seth Smith, PhD, director of the Center for Human Imaging in the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (VUIIS), has been appointed the institute’s first associate director.

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Goal of new tissue-chip research is to assess efficacy of novel epilepsy drugs

Sep. 20, 2017—An interdisciplinary team of Vanderbilt University researchers has received a two-year, $2-million federal grant to develop an “organ-on-chip” model for two genetic forms of epilepsy.

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Drivers of breast cancer metastasis

Jul. 20, 2017—Signaling through a complex of proteins called mTORC2 plays a role in breast cancer migration, invasion and metastasis, Vanderbilt researchers reported.

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Device helps ICU patients by filtering out noise from medical alarms

Jun. 21, 2017—A team of investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) wants to improve patient outcomes in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) settings by silencing audible medical alarms in hospital rooms.

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Drug developed for arthritis could be first to stop heart valve calcification

Jun. 12, 2017—The first drug to treat calcification of heart valves may be one originally designed for rheumatoid arthritis.

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Three students named Goldwater Scholars for 2017

Apr. 6, 2017—Vanderbilt students Lauren Branscombe, Joshua Fleck and David Zhang have been recognized in this year’s Goldwater Scholars competition. They are among a group of 240 scholars selected on the basis of academic merit from a field of 1,286 mathematics, science and engineering students nationwide.

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Nanobeacon lights up colon tumors

Mar. 30, 2017—A novel fluorescent nanobeacon can distinguish normal from diseased colon tissue, potentially offering advantages for colorectal cancer screening.

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Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart’s biomechanical properties

Feb. 22, 2017—Scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart’s amazing biomechanical properties in order to study cardiac disease, develop heart drugs.

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Softening tumor tissue could aid cancer treatments

Jan. 16, 2017—Tumors cause the intracellular material surrounding them to stiffen. Softening this protective layer could make existing cancer treatments more effective, according to new research.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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