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Cancer Research Archives

Study identifies critical regulator of tumor-specific T cell differentiation

Jun. 18, 2019—A study published June 17 in Nature offers clues as to why blocking inhibitory receptors on tumor-infiltrating T cells may not always work

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Receptor’s role in stopping H. pylori

Apr. 25, 2019—The immune receptor NOD1 may be a prime target for preventing or treating H. pylori infections — the most significant risk factor for stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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Discovery aids search for cancer biomarkers

Apr. 11, 2019—A report by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center has shattered conventional wisdom about how cells, including cancer cells, shed DNA into the bloodstream: they don’t do it by packaging the genetic material in tiny vesicles called exosomes.

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Discovery points to new cancer immunotherapy option

Feb. 21, 2019—An international team involving Vanderbilt researchers has discovered that a new “checkpoint” protein on immune system cells is active in tumors, and that blocking it — in combination with other treatments — is a successful therapeutic approach in mouse models of cancer.

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Breast cancer-killing RIG

Dec. 13, 2018—A compound that activates a virus-sensing receptor has potent therapeutic effects in a mouse model of breast cancer.

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Study examines new breast cancer drug combination

Apr. 20, 2017—A study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) investigators suggests a drug combination which includes a PDK1 protein blocker may be more effective for breast cancer that has become resistant to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4/6) targeted therapy.

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V Foundation grants bolster cancer initiatives

Nov. 17, 2016—Two Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) investigators have earned grant awards from The V Foundation for Cancer Research, continuing the foundation’s support for innovative cancer research initiatives at VICC.

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In search of new cancer targets

Sep. 9, 2016—Vanderbilt researchers developed a new algorithm to find clinically targetable gene rearrangements in cancers.

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New breast cancer driver

Aug. 26, 2016—Vanderbilt investigators have demonstrated that a certain protein complex drives tumor progression in aggressive breast cancers.

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Switching breast cancer off

Apr. 14, 2016—Signaling by a receptor that is overexpressed in aggressive forms of breast cancer has been linked to glutamine metabolism, suggesting new anti-cancer therapeutic targets.

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Overcoming lung cancer drug resistance

Feb. 10, 2016—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a way to overcome the resistance of some lung cancers to certain targeted therapies, which could lead to more effective treatments for lung cancer patients.

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Gene profile predicts metastasis

Feb. 9, 2015—A specific gene expression profile represents a novel, biologically relevant “signature” for identifying colon cancers with high risk of metastatic recurrence, Vanderbilt researchers have found.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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