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Cell Reports Archives

How bugs overcome host defenses

Apr. 11, 2019—Vanderbilt researchers led by Eric Skaar are probing the mechanisms bacteria use when faced with nutrient starvation — a host defense strategy called “nutritional immunity.”

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Destructive ‘telegrams’ in asthma

Jan. 31, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered that certain microRNAs — "telegram"-like signals — increase after the induction of allergic airway inflammation.

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Genetic balancing act

Aug. 2, 2018—New findings about proteins involved in DNA repair are important for understanding why some cancers are more or less resistant to certain therapies.

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Discovery by Vanderbilt-led group could lead to improved diabetes treatment

Mar. 6, 2018—Vanderbilt investigators and colleagues around the country have made a major discovery that could lead to better ways to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D).

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Research finds midlife women twice as likely as men to have asthma

Nov. 28, 2017—In childhood, asthma is more common in boys than girls. But around the time of puberty, that picture reverses. By mid-life women are twice as likely as men to have asthma.

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Salt, inflammation and hypertension

Nov. 13, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers have identified a pathway that links excess sodium, inflammation and hypertension.

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Glowing receptors help find and track cancerous growth

May. 18, 2017—Under the microscope, they sparkle like emeralds, these molecules that may hold a key to understanding — and stopping — cancerous growth.

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Study suggests new way to treat rare autism disorder

Aug. 25, 2016—A protein that plays a powerful role in learning and memory may be a key to improving treatment of a rare autism spectrum disorder called Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), a new study suggests.

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Transcription factor evolution

Aug. 11, 2016—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a novel model of evolution for factors that control gene expression.

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Breast cancer: finding the smoking gun

Jul. 20, 2016—A new method developed at Vanderbilt may help “inventory” all tumor-promoting genes.

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It takes two to tango: beta cell development

Jun. 23, 2016—Defining the genes required for the function of insulin-producing beta cells is crucial for ongoing efforts to develop a cell-based therapy for diabetes.

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An Argonaute’s voyage to cancer

Apr. 28, 2016—A genetic mutation that promotes cancer development blocks the normal sorting of a protein called “Argonaute 2.”

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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