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congenital heart disease Archives

Cell-cell signals in developing heart

Jun. 10, 2019—Scott Baldwin and colleagues have discovered early signaling events during heart development, findings that could guide cell replacement therapies for heart disease.

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More congenital heart patients becoming transplant candidates

May. 2, 2019—Patients with a form of congenital heart disease — having only one ventricle (pumping chamber) — are now living longer lives due to the successful surgical and medical treatments they receive as children.

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Novel program gives congenital heart disease patients new options

Aug. 23, 2018—Experts at the Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute are forging new ground in the development of a first-of-its-kind program aimed at adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD).

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Risk factors for faulty rhythms

Aug. 16, 2018—Risk factors for arrhythmias after heart surgery in infants include medications, infant age and higher surgical complexity, but not two genetic variants examined by Vanderbilt researchers.

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NOTCH1 role in heart development

Jul. 3, 2017—The identification of a genetic culprit for hypoplastic left heart syndrome could lead to new treatments for the condition.

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Mutation raises heart block risk

Mar. 3, 2017—A newly identified genetic risk factor for heart block after surgery may help guide the course of postoperative care.

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VUMC nurse’s personal experiences drive her care of patients with congenital heart defects

Jun. 2, 2016—Every day, Misty Sharpe looks at the scar down the center of her chest and knows she’s a survivor. She has had four heart surgeries to repair congenital heart defects, ranging from when she was 4 days old to 4 years old. Sharpe, MSN, R.N., now works as a nurse case manager in the Pediatric Cardiology Clinic, treating patients with congenital heart defects and working to raise awareness of the condition.

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Children, heart disease, and IQ

Nov. 16, 2015—Treatment for congenital heart disease during infancy may result in cognitive and attentional deficits during adolescence and young adulthood, Vanderbilt researchers have found.

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Newborn screening program championed at VU helps save boy

Apr. 11, 2013—John Isaac Stone Seabolt was born Feb. 26, less than two months after a new state law went into effect encouraging the screening of newborn babies for “silent” heart defects.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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