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CTSA Archives

Heat a trigger for seizures

Sep. 6, 2017—Elevated body temperature alone can increase vulnerability to fever-induced seizures, even in the absence of infection or inflammation.

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Pain and Alzheimer’s disease

Sep. 5, 2017—Clinicians should use a structured interview in people with Alzheimer’s disease to identify pain that might be otherwise overlooked.

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VUMC lands renewal of Clinical and Translational Science Award

Jun. 8, 2017—Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) has competed successfully for a second renewal of its Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Superior scan for tumors

Jun. 24, 2016—Imaging with a compound that binds to neuroendocrine cells is a safer and more effective way to detect rare neuroendocrine tumors.

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Children, heart disease, and IQ

Nov. 16, 2015—Treatment for congenital heart disease during infancy may result in cognitive and attentional deficits during adolescence and young adulthood, Vanderbilt researchers have found.

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Revised regulations proposed for human subject research

Oct. 22, 2015—Eighteen departments and agencies of the federal government have joined to propose revised regulations for scientific research involving human subjects.

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Potential mechanism for myeloma drug’s variable toxicity

Apr. 30, 2014—A genetic variant is associated with toxicity of the chemotherapy drug melphalan, and could guide individualized dosing for the medication.

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E-records shed light on drug response

Mar. 31, 2014—Electronic medical records linked to DNA biobanks are a valid resource for defining and understanding the genetic factors that contribute to drug response.

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Mapping brain circuitry

Mar. 28, 2014—Vanderbilt investigators have used two types of neuroimaging to establish a “map” of connections for a brain region important in anxiety and addiction.

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Flu boosts pneumococcal colonization

Mar. 27, 2014—Influenza and parainfluenza infections – but not other respiratory viruses – increase the risk of acquiring pneumococcal bacteria, the most common cause of severe pneumonia.

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A pain in the … genes

Jan. 10, 2014—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered that variation in the gene encoding the potassium channel GIRK1 plays a role in modulating human pain perception.

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Rhythm response tied to gene variant

Jun. 21, 2013—A genetic variant that increases risk for atrial fibrillation also impacts the response to a common therapy for the heart rhythm disorder.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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