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Department of Medicine Archives

Probing the pathology of impaired cognition

Oct. 25, 2018—Detecting the neuropathology underlying cognitive impairment by lead to new targeted therapies.

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Antipsychotics ineffective for treating ICU delirium: study

Oct. 22, 2018—Critically ill patients are not benefiting from antipsychotic medications that have been used to treat delirium in intensive care units (ICUs) for more than four decades, according to a study released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Asthma’s androgen connection

Oct. 12, 2018—New findings may explain why the prevalence of asthma is higher in women and suggest that testosterone derivatives may be useful for treating more severe types of asthma.

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Targeting diabetic kidney disease

Oct. 12, 2018—Pathways activated by the epidermal growth factor receptor may be attractive targets to treat diabetic kidney disease, according to new findings from Vanderbilt investigators.

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Novel genetic study sheds new light on risk of heart attack

Oct. 11, 2018—Loss of a protein that regulates mitochondrial function can greatly increase the risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack), Vanderbilt scientists reported Oct. 3 in the journal eLife.

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Team’s study reveals hidden lives of medical biomarkers

Oct. 11, 2018—What do medical biomarkers do on evenings and weekends, when they might be considered off the clock?

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Study reveals new targets to inhibit pulmonary fibrosis

Oct. 4, 2018—In a study out this week in Science Translational Medicine, an international team led by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center sheds new light on the cause of pulmonary fibrosis and demonstrates a way to impede the disease in mice.

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Stretch, inflammation and hypertension

Sep. 27, 2018—New research sheds light on how changes in blood vessel forces enhance immune cell activation and promote hypertension.

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Cancer Moonshot award to help map tumor progression

Sep. 27, 2018—A trans-institutional team of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Vanderbilt University has received an $11 million Cancer Moonshot grant to build a single-cell resolution atlas to map out the routes that benign colonic polyps take to progress to colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer among both men and women in the United States.

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Clinic helps adults clarify true status of penicillin allergy

Sep. 27, 2018—by Bill Snyder Two years ago when she was given a type of penicillin to fight off bacterial pneumonia, Kelly Cummins developed a rash, itching and shortness of breath. Suspecting she was having a reaction to the life-saving medication, her doctor stopped the penicillin and substituted a different class of antibiotic. Cummins recovered but now...

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New HIV research training program launched

Sep. 20, 2018—With the help of a $1.6 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center is launching a specialized research training program called Vanderbilt Scholars in HIV and Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Research, or V-SCHoLARs.

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Diabetes drug may prevent cancer

Sep. 14, 2018—The research suggests that metformin should be further studied clinically for the prevention of liver cancer.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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