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DOD Archives

VUMC and TGen receive $6.1 million in grants to study deadly lung disease

Mar. 27, 2019—Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope and the Norton Thoracic Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Arizona, have received a $3.5 million federal grant to study the cause of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) the nation’s most common and severe form of fibrotic lung disease.

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VUMC scientists ‘sprint’ to find anti-Zika antibodies

Jan. 24, 2019—Scientists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues in Boston, Seattle and St. Louis are racing to develop — in a mere 90 days — a protective antibody-based treatment that can stop the spread of the Zika virus.

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DOD study to explore guidelines for ankle, knee surgery patients

Jun. 7, 2018—Although military personnel often suffer ankle and knee fractures requiring surgery, there’s no definitive consensus on when they should stop using crutches and start putting weight on their injured limbs again.

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Team seeks to build EMR system for battlefield scenarios

Oct. 19, 2017—Daniel Fabbri, Ph.D., assistant professor of Biomedical Informatics and Computer Science, has been awarded a $1.7 million research grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to create an automated clinical documentation system for use in battlefield ambulances and helicopters.

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New grants bolster Trauma program’s research initiatives

Feb. 9, 2017—Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Division of Trauma, Emergency General Surgery and Surgical Critical Care was recently awarded two new research grants.

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Grant spurs research into trauma-induced vision loss

Feb. 4, 2016—Tonia Rex, Ph.D., and colleagues at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute are working to uncover how best to treat ocular trauma, the fourth leading cause of blindness worldwide.

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Efforts to support employees in Guard, Reserve honored

Sep. 10, 2015—Vanderbilt University Medical Center officials were recently honored by the Committee for the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) for their dedication to supporting reserve military personnel.

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Improving breast cancer chemo by testing tumors in a dish

Oct. 28, 2014—A team of biomedical engineers has developed a new "tumor-in-a-dish" technology that promises to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

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Study tracks how gene may promote lung cancer tumors

Aug. 9, 2012—Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have identified how one of the genes most commonly mutated in lung cancer may promote such tumors.

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Skeletal defects in genetic disorder

Nov. 18, 2011—A new mouse model provides a tool for testing novel therapeutic approaches for neurofibromatosis.

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Protein family key to aging linked to suppressing tumors

Oct. 28, 2011—The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health.

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Protein related to aging holds breast cancer clues

Feb. 1, 2011—The most common type of breast cancer in older women – estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) positive breast cancer – has been linked to a protein that fends off aging-related cellular damage. A new study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researcher David Gius now shows how a deficiency in this aging-associated protein may set the...

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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