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featured research Archives

Looking beyond the ‘magic bullet’ approach to drug discovery

May. 1, 2018—Vanderbilt scientists have developed a new process that can rapidly and inexpensively identify personalized cancer drugs derived from nature.

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‘Smart cane’ could one day help flag gait problems, falling risks more quickly

Feb. 12, 2018—Falling is no joke when you're a senior citizen or have other balance issues. Vanderbilt engineers are working on a 'smart cane' that could help physical therapists spot and treat problems sooner.

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‘Mind’s eye blink’ proves ‘paying attention’ is not just a figure of speech

Nov. 21, 2017—Vanderbilt psychologists have discovered that when you shift your attention from one place to another, your brain 'blinks'—or experiences momentary gaps in perception.

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Battery-switching device promises more road time for Tesla, Leaf drivers

Nov. 20, 2017—A device out Vanderbilt's engineering school reconfigures modules in electric car battery packs to be online or offline – depending on whether they’re going to pull down the other modules.

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Cell signals that trigger wound healing are surprisingly complex

Oct. 3, 2017—Vanderbilt scientists have taken an important step toward understanding the way in which injured cells trigger wound healing, an insight essential for improving treatments of all types of wounds.

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Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart’s biomechanical properties

Feb. 22, 2017—Scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart’s amazing biomechanical properties in order to study cardiac disease, develop heart drugs.

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Early experience with federal health coverage suggests how future Medicaid reforms may work

Feb. 1, 2017—Proposed Medicaid reforms are similar to the capped federal financing system in place during the '50s and early '60s, when states generally reimbursed a much smaller proportion of health care for the needy.

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Softening tumor tissue could aid cancer treatments

Jan. 16, 2017—Tumors cause the intracellular material surrounding them to stiffen. Softening this protective layer could make existing cancer treatments more effective, according to new research.

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Research that ruled in 2016: Readers’ favorite stories

Dec. 16, 2016—Artificial kidneys, gay-straight alliances and junkyard batteries captured readers' attention in 2016.

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Broken shoulder leads to carpal tunnel syndrome surgery study

Dec. 13, 2016—After injuring his shoulder, a psychology professor collaborated with his orthopedic surgeon on a study to see how quickly patients regained their typing speed after carpal tunnel surgery.

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Type of psychotherapy matters in treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

Dec. 12, 2016—A new study has found that the type of psychotherapy used to treat the gastrointestinal disorder irritable bowel syndrome makes a difference in improving patients' daily functioning.

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Blood-brain barrier on a chip sheds new light on “silent killer”

Dec. 6, 2016—A new microfluidic device containing human cells that faithfully mimics the behavior of the blood-brain barrier is providing new insights into brain inflammation, the silent killer.

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