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Gastroenterology Archives

Study identifies novel genetic factors for colorectal cancer risk

Jan. 10, 2019—A large-scale study conducted among East Asians and led by Vanderbilt researchers has identified multiple, previously unknown genetic risk factors for colorectal cancer.

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Bile acids mediate metabolic benefits of weight-loss surgery

Jan. 10, 2019—A team of Vanderbilt investigators has pinpointed the role of bile acids and a specific signaling pathway in the positive metabolic effects of weight-loss surgery.

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Team isolates antibodies that neutralize GI bug norovirus

Aug. 30, 2018—Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have isolated the first human monoclonal antibodies that can neutralize norovirus, the leading cause of acute gastrointestinal illness in the world.

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Study suggests cancer’s ‘clock’ can be rewound

Mar. 17, 2016—Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have “turned back the clock” in a mouse model of metaplasia — precancerous stomach lesions — raising hopes that gastric cancer, a worldwide scourge that’s rising in the United States, can be prevented.

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Study sheds light on human gut’s ‘pacemaker’ cells

Jul. 30, 2015—The gut has its own built-in pacemakers, populations of specialized cells that control smooth muscle contraction in the stomach, small intestine and colon.

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Improving patients’ quality of life drives Lind’s clinical care

Jul. 9, 2015—As a gastroenterologist, Christopher Lind, M.D., says he is often the “butt” of jokes, but few people truly appreciate the role the gut plays in their happiness.

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Peek named editor-in-chief of leading gastroenterology journal

May. 7, 2015—Richard Peek, M.D., director of the Vanderbilt Digestive Disease Research Center, has been appointed to a five-year term as editor-in-chief of the medical journal Gastroenterology beginning July 2016.

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Therapeutic target for gastric cancer

Dec. 12, 2013—A protein kinase linked to inflammation and tumor development may be a good target for gastric cancer therapies.

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Early stomach troubles augur anxiety

May. 2, 2012—Children with stomach troubles grow up to be anxious adolescents and young adults, according to a recent study.

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Colon cancer’s cellular crossroads

Mar. 16, 2012—New information about signaling pathways involved in colorectal cancer could aid in assessing prognosis and identifying new therapeutic targets for the disease.

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Pathway to colon cancer progression

Dec. 1, 2011—Molecular players involved in colon cancer progression could provide new biomarkers to indicate invasiveness and prognosis.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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