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HIV Archives

Pediatric HIV researcher Carlucci discusses work in Mozambique

Mar. 21, 2019—When James Carlucci, MD, MPH, instructor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, is in Nashville he treats children at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. When he’s on one of the several trips he takes each year to Mozambique, he’s trying to understand when and why HIV-exposed infants fall out of care — and how to change it.

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New HIV research training program launched

Sep. 20, 2018—With the help of a $1.6 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center is launching a specialized research training program called Vanderbilt Scholars in HIV and Heart, Lung, Blood and Sleep Research, or V-SCHoLARs.

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A “public” target for HIV

Jun. 8, 2018—Common sequences of antibodies against HIV may be key to developing a successful vaccine strategy for the virus.

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HIV outreach and return to care

Nov. 9, 2017—When chronic disease patients let their care lapse and fail to show for clinic appointments, it may behoove clinics to reach out and encourage a return to care.

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VIGH receives federal grants to fight kidney disease

Oct. 12, 2017—Researchers in the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) have received two new grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) aimed at reducing the risk of kidney disease in HIV-infected adults and improving the treatment of epilepsy in children in Nigeria.

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Major international study testing therapy to prevent spread of HIV

Oct. 5, 2017—Nine more volunteers are needed to complete a study at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) that could lead to a way to prevent the spread of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus).

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Combination therapy PrEP offers effective way to prevent HIV infection

Sep. 7, 2017—Rates of new HIV infections in the United States are declining — except among men who have sex with men. Rates are particularly high among African-American and Hispanic men and especially in the South.

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Restricting HIV-1 infection

Sep. 1, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers are discovering ways that host proteins block HIV-1 infection, which could suggest new avenues for treatment.

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Researchers study unique couples intervention in Mozambique to reduce HIV transmission

Aug. 3, 2017—Researchers in the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health are testing whether a unique “couples-centered” intervention developed in the southern African nation of Mozambique can reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

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HIV-infected people have higher risk of heart failure

Apr. 27, 2017—The first large study to report that HIV-infected people have a significantly higher risk of heart failure in the antiretroviral therapy era has been published in JAMA Cardiology.

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Blood exposures for traditional healers

Sep. 23, 2016—Traditional healers in sub-Saharan have a high rate of exposure to blood, putting them at risk for HIV and hepatitis C.

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HIV treatment and TB risk

Aug. 4, 2016—Tuberculosis (TB) remains an important public health problem, particularly among people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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