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intestines Archives

Microvilli in motion

Sep. 19, 2019—Live cell imaging studies have revealed that microvilli — finger-like protrusions on the surface of epithelial cells — move and collide as they form the brush border.

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Host-microbe interactions in the gut

Aug. 13, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators demonstrated that intestinal cells promote beneficial microbe behavior — the findings support developing microbiota-based therapies for intestinal health.

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Intestinal immune cell interactions

Jul. 30, 2019—Understanding the roles of various immune cells that reside in the gut lining could shed light on inflammatory bowel diseases.

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Adhesion protein optimizes border

Feb. 14, 2019—Matthew Tyska and colleagues have found that an adhesion protein plays a key role in building the intestinal brush border that is essential for absorbing nutrients.

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How microvilli form

Sep. 13, 2018—A protein called IRTKS helps build the microvilli that form the border of cells in the intestines, explaining why the protein is a frequent target of gut pathogens.

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Cell skeleton and the brush border

Jan. 31, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a role for microtubules — part of the cellular “skeleton” — in organizing the unique sidedness of the epithelial cells that line organs like the intestines.

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Lineage tracing in the gut

Nov. 30, 2017—Vanderbilt investigators have developed an algorithm to classify cell types from experimental data, making it possible to understand how organs develop.

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Gut response to fluid flow

Oct. 26, 2017—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered that microvilli – finger-like projections from cells in the intestine – respond to the shear stress of fluid flow to drive a cellular pathway that regulates nutrient balance.

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Motoring to the tips of the brush border

Oct. 6, 2016—New findings implicate a motor protein in the assembly of the brush border in the intestines and kidneys – a specialized surface that is critical for healthy organ function.

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Building intestinal brush borders

Feb. 8, 2016—Studies of the molecular complex that helps build specialized cellular surfaces could shed light on the mechanisms underlying a genetic deaf-blindness syndrome accompanied by intestinal disease.

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Immune cells that guard against ingested pathogens discovered

Oct. 9, 2014—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a new type of immune cell residing in the intestinal epithelium that may function as a first line of defense against ingested pathogens.

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Nutrient-absorbing surface’s assembly revealed: study

Apr. 17, 2014—Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered how intestinal cells build the "brush border" -- a specialized surface structure that is critical for absorbing nutrients and defending against pathogens.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

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Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

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Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital with helipad

Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital with helipad

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