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Jens Meiler Archives

Study reframes approach to targeted therapy resistance

Apr. 11, 2019—When a tumor mutates and develops resistance to a targeted therapy, researchers often focus on the acquisition of new mutations within the drug target as they seek an alternative treatment, but a team of Vanderbilt scientists has shown this may not be sufficient.

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Designing antibodies to fight the flu

Jan. 31, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators said their work shows that computational design can improve the ability of naturally occurring antibodies to recognize different flu strains and may hasten the development of more effective flu therapies and vaccines.

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Transcription factor evolution

Aug. 11, 2016—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a novel model of evolution for factors that control gene expression.

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‘Young Scientist’ showcases high schoolers’ research at Vanderbilt

Jun. 2, 2016—High school students performing advanced research at Vanderbilt have the opportunity to share their findings with the scientific community through a journal of their own.

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Potent HIV antibodies suggest new vaccine development approach

Apr. 7, 2016—It’s been known for some time that the immune system can produce antibodies capable of “neutralizing” HIV, and stopping the AIDS-causing virus dead in its tracks.

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Dynamics of a drug resistance transporter

Feb. 5, 2016—Vanderbilt investigators are exploring the shape changes in a multidrug transporter to understand the mechanisms of antibacterial resistance.

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‘Redesigned’ antibodies may control HIV: study

May. 21, 2015—With the help of a computer program called “Rosetta,” researchers at Vanderbilt University have “redesigned” an antibody that has increased potency and can neutralize more strains of the AIDS-causing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than can any known natural antibody.

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VU lands $9 million NIH grant to design better flu vaccines

May. 15, 2015—Vanderbilt University researchers have received a five-year, $9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to design more effective flu vaccines and novel antibody therapies.

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Members named to Academic Strategic Plan committees

Oct. 27, 2014—Two committees tasked with fleshing out key initiatives in Vanderbilt’s Academic Strategic Plan are now staffed and ready to begin work.

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VU researchers report G protein advancement that could lead to more effective drugs

Dec. 2, 2013—Thanks in part to a computer program named “Rosetta,” Vanderbilt University researchers are closer to understanding how the ubiquitous G protein is activated – a discovery that could lead to the design of more specific and effective drugs.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

A diagnosis of cancer at any age is tragic, but during the adolescent and young adult years, it’s especially complicated.

Hope

A diagnosis of cancer at any age is tragic, but during the adolescent and young adult years, it’s especially complicated.

Karen Dyer Young cares for patients and members of the Dayani Center who have or are recovering from cancer or a stem cell transplant.

Momentum

Karen Dyer Young cares for patients and members of the Dayani Center who have or are recovering from cancer or a stem cell transplant.

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