Skip to main content

Molecular Physiology & Biophysics Archives

New window on fibrosis

Aug. 8, 2019—A previously unrecognized role for a cell surface receptor may open new therapeutic options for the treatment of fibrotic diseases.

Read more


New look at atherosclerosis

Jul. 11, 2019—A new imaging method makes it possible to directly measure cell division and changes in metabolism in atherosclerotic plaques.

Read more


Modulating stress circuits

Feb. 14, 2019—Danny Winder and colleagues demonstrate an interaction between two signaling pathways — and its impact on the activity of neurons that respond to stress.

Read more


Lean vs. obese adipose tissue cells

Dec. 13, 2018—A greater understanding of the mechanisms and cell types involved in returning adipose (fatty) tissue to the lean state may lead to more effective treatments for obesity.

Read more


Four researchers receive Young Investigator Grants

Nov. 15, 2018—Four Vanderbilt University researchers are among 200 recipients of this year’s Young Investigator Grants awarded by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to support “innovative ideas for groundbreaking neurobiological research.”

Read more


Obesity negates beneficial drug effects

Nov. 8, 2018—A drug that improves levels of “good” cholesterol may not be beneficial for obese individuals, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

Read more


Fat tissue’s “iron sink”

Sep. 27, 2018—Alyssa Hasty and colleagues demonstrated that immune cells called macrophages act in fat tissue to store iron and prevent iron toxicity.

Read more


Unleashing TIGER on small RNAs

Sep. 5, 2018—Vanderbilt investigators have developed a new analytical tool to identify, quantify and analyze small RNAs.

Read more


Gene mutation discovery may hold autism clues: study

Feb. 2, 2017—Researchers at Vanderbilt have identified what may be a genetic “smoking gun” for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) — a mutation in the gene for the critical neuronal protein CaMKII.

Read more


Protecting the blood-brain barrier

Dec. 9, 2016—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered how a promising cancer immunotherapy causes brain swelling, findings that could lead to ways to protect brain function while fighting cancers.

Read more


Making human beta cells reproduce

Dec. 8, 2016—A new method developed at Vanderbilt will speed the search for potential therapeutics for diabetes: compounds that stimulate the replication of insulin-producing beta cells.

Read more


Bioluminescent sensor causes brain cells to glow in the dark

Oct. 27, 2016—A team of Vanderbilt scientists have genetically modified luciferase, the enzyme that produces bioluminescence, so that it acts as an optical sensor that records activity in brain cells.

Read more


Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

more