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NCRR Archives

Low prenatal alcohol’s brain impact

Dec. 21, 2012—Even relatively low levels of in utero alcohol exposure impact fetal brain development, and the effects last into adulthood, study finds.

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More gene links to breast cancer risk

Oct. 19, 2012—Two newly identified gene variants linked to breast cancer may aid in predicting disease risk and targeting screening and prevention strategies.

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Parkinson’s therapy may impact language

Sep. 7, 2012—Deep brain stimulation used to treat Parkinson’s disease may impair some aspects of language processing, a recent study suggests.

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Early stomach troubles augur anxiety

May. 2, 2012—Children with stomach troubles grow up to be anxious adolescents and young adults, according to a recent study.

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Better blood pressure-reducing drugs?

Apr. 30, 2012—A newer version of an old class of blood pressure lowering drugs may offer advantages for obese patients with metabolic syndrome.

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Wilms’ tumors differ in developing nations

Apr. 13, 2012—In addition to limited health care resources, biological factors may play a role in the poor survival of children with a common kidney cancer in developing nations.

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Colon cancer’s cellular crossroads

Mar. 16, 2012—New information about signaling pathways involved in colorectal cancer could aid in assessing prognosis and identifying new therapeutic targets for the disease.

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Combo combats dizziness

Mar. 9, 2012—Some patients may need a combo of medications to combat a condition that causes dizziness.

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Matchmaker for clinical studies

Feb. 8, 2012—ResearchMatch.org is a web-based registry that is connecting participants and researchers for clinical studies.

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Fishing for heart attack repair tools

Jan. 5, 2012—Managing myocardial infarction – and the resulting heart failure – remains a clinical challenge. To search for chemicals that can stimulate cardiac muscle cell production, Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology investigators led by Tao Zhong, Ph.D., Terri Ni, Ph.D., and Eric Rellinger, M.D., turned to a novel drug discovery tool: zebrafish. The researchers visually screened...

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Meds’ benefits differ in dialysis patients

Jan. 5, 2012—About half of kidney patients will die from heart disease within five years of starting dialysis, yet patients with kidney failure are rarely included in heart disease research. Jorge Gamboa, M.D., T. Alp Ikizler, M.D., and Nancy Brown, M.D., completed a small study that suggests a more personalized approach to selecting medication for heart disease...

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Lung nodule surgery not always “futile”

Dec. 7, 2011—Even when lung operations for suspected cancer resection results in a benign diagnosis, there still may be significant benefits to the procedure, new research suggests.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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