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New England Journal of Medicine Archives

All of Us Research Program Takes Aim at Precision Population Health

Aug. 14, 2019—Scarcely a year after its national launch, the “All of Us” research program, which aims to accelerate the prevention and treatment of disease, has enrolled more than 230,000 research participants — more than a fifth of its recruitment goal of 1 million people. All

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VUMC study finds helping patients breathe during intubation prevents life-threatening complications

Feb. 18, 2019—Thousands of Americans die each year during a dangerous two-minute procedure to insert a breathing tube. Now a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) is showing that using bag-mask ventilation, squeezing air from a bag into the mouth for 60 seconds to help patients’ breathing, improves outcomes and could potentially save lives.

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Combination therapy improves small-cell lung cancer survival

Oct. 25, 2018—Patients with stage IV small-cell lung cancer lived longer when given the immunotherapy atezolizumab with chemotherapy, setting the stage for what could become the first new treatment approved in decades for this particularly aggressive form of lung cancer.

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Antipsychotics ineffective for treating ICU delirium: study

Oct. 22, 2018—Critically ill patients are not benefiting from antipsychotic medications that have been used to treat delirium in intensive care units (ICUs) for more than four decades, according to a study released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Time window extended for some stroke surgeries

Mar. 1, 2018—New research indicates the time window for a thrombectomy following a stroke is longer than previously thought, but how soon the surgery occurs still matters.

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Saline use on decline at Vanderbilt following landmark studies

Feb. 27, 2018—Vanderbilt University Medical Center is encouraging its medical providers to stop using saline as intravenous fluid therapy for most patients, a change provoked by two companion landmark studies released Feb. 27 that are anticipated to improve survival and decrease kidney complications.

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Team finds stem cell transplant improves scleroderma survival

Feb. 15, 2018—A new clinical trial by investigators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and other leading medical centers found that an intensive transplant treatment using the patient’s own stem cells can improve survival and quality of life for patients with advanced scleroderma.

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NEJM Catalyst forum addresses mental, behavioral and social health determinants

Jan. 29, 2018—Healthcare is more than diagnosing and treating disease. To truly improve health outcomes for individuals and communities, the mental, behavioral and social determinants of health must be fully integrated with physical factors at all levels of the healthcare system.

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New lab formulary improves quality, cuts cost

Sep. 21, 2017—An effort at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) to enhance clinical decision making through cross-departmental collaboration and effective use of diagnostics has improved patient care and saved the institution more than $1 million in 2016, VUMC officials reported this week.

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New approach for staph-related skin abscesses explored

Jul. 13, 2017—New multicenter research that includes Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) investigators, could change treatment approaches to simple skin abscesses, infections often caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria.

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Preserving NIH’s Fogarty International Center crucial for global health efforts

May. 26, 2017—This week Douglas Heimburger, M.D., M.S., professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt, joined a growing chorus calling for preservation of the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Social risk factors influence outcomes, Medicare payment

Feb. 8, 2017—Social risk factors including income, education and ethnic background influence health outcomes and should be taken into account in Medicare payment models, according to a New England Journal of Medicine “Perspective” titled “Social Risk Factors and Equity in Medicare Payment.”

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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