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NHLBI Archives

New look at atherosclerosis

Jul. 11, 2019—A new imaging method makes it possible to directly measure cell division and changes in metabolism in atherosclerotic plaques.

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Study seeks to expand treatment options for rare airway disease

Jun. 13, 2019—Armed with $1.2 million in funding from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center are searching to understand the cause of a rare airway disease in hopes of developing better treatments.

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Cell-cell signals in developing heart

Jun. 10, 2019—Scott Baldwin and colleagues have discovered early signaling events during heart development, findings that could guide cell replacement therapies for heart disease.

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Blueprint for rebuilding the heart

May. 9, 2019—Young-Jae Nam and colleagues are discovering how to express specific factors in connective tissue cells to turn them into heart muscle cells.

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The dynamic basement

May. 9, 2019—Vanderbilt scientists led by Andrea Page-McCaw have discovered a new way to analyze repair of basement membranes — important structural and functional components of tissues.

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Low oxygen and antibody responses

Apr. 25, 2019—Mark Boothby and colleagues are exploring the factors that contribute to antibody production and quality, which are key to our defense against pathogens and response to vaccines.

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Cardiac dysfunction in DMD

Mar. 28, 2019—The protein MMP7 is elevated in blood from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have cardiac dysfunction, suggesting that it may be a biomarker for heart disease severity.

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Drug interaction causes hypotension

Mar. 28, 2019—A muscle relaxing-drug and inhibitors of the metabolic enzyme CYP1A2 interact to cause severely low blood pressure and should not be co-prescribed, Vanderbilt investigators caution.

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Unraveling endocytosis

Mar. 28, 2019—New discoveries by Jason MacGurn and colleagues further understanding of the complex machinery that cells use take up substances from outside the cell.

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Cell death pathway implicated in bone marrow failure

Jan. 31, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators have linked a specific form of programmed cell death to myelodysplastic syndrome, a type of bone marrow failure.

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Parsing diabetic skin infections

Nov. 29, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a role for an inflammatory mediator in diabetic skin infections, suggesting new therapeutic targets for this common complication of diabetes.

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Vanderbilt study suggests way to prevent rare lung disease

Nov. 15, 2018—Research by Vanderbilt scientists suggests that it may be possible to prevent or even reverse pulmonary arterial hypertension, a rare, progressive disease characterized by narrowing of and high blood pressure in the small arteries of the lungs.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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