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NIAID Archives

‘Proofreader’ key to coronavirus growth

Sep. 12, 2013—A coronavirus protein is required for replication of the viral genome and may be a good treatment target for SARS and other diseases caused by coronaviruses.

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Probing intestinal immune cell roles

Aug. 28, 2013—A new in vitro system will allow investigators to explore how immune system T cells develop specialized functions.

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Nuclear shield against cell death

Aug. 8, 2013—The protein SARM appears to protect cells from inflammation-driven death by stabilizing the nuclear laminin scaffold.

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Defining patient retention

Jul. 15, 2013—Vanderbilt researchers propose guidelines for defining patient retention in clinical studies – an important parameter that affects study conclusions and program evaluations.

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Studies outline new model for staph bone infections

Jun. 20, 2013—Osteomyelitis, a debilitating bone infection most frequently caused by Staphylococcus aureus (“staph”) bacteria, is particularly challenging to treat.

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Salt revs stomach bug’s cancer impact

May. 13, 2013—A high-salt diet worsens the carcinogenic effects of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that colonizes the stomachs of half of the world’s population.

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Taking the ‘noise’ out of protein data

May. 1, 2013—Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel algorithm to improve results from proteomic studies.

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Factor reduces virus-related asthma attacks

Apr. 26, 2013—An immune system factor associated with severe asthma may actually reduce asthma attacks induced by viral infections.

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“Silent” B cells trigger autoimmunity

Apr. 3, 2013—Immune cells that recognize self antigens (e.g. insulin), but are functionally silent, can trigger autoimmune diseases such as diabetes.

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Bacterial resistance breaks bridges

Mar. 14, 2013—Understanding how bacteria become resistant to quinolone antibiotics could guide strategies for developing new antibacterial drugs.

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Starting up protein synthesis, in yeast

Feb. 28, 2013—Researchers have found an unusual interaction between a factor that “turns on” protein synthesis and one that produces fatty acids.

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Antibacterial protein’s molecular workings revealed

Feb. 21, 2013—Vanderbilt investigators report new insights to the workings of calprotectin, an immune system protein that “starves” bacterial pathogens of the metal nutrients they require.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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