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NIH funding Archives

Team identifies new gene candidates for breast cancer risk

Jun. 28, 2018—Jun. 28, 2018—An international coalition led by scientists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Herston, Australia, has identified 48 candidate susceptibility genes for breast cancer risk, including 14 genes at loci (chromosome regions) not yet reported for breast cancer.

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Study finds broken circadian clock in human tumors

Mar. 29, 2018—Human tumors appear to have a broken circadian clock, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center report in the journal PeerJ.

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Study of mucus may help guide sinusitis treatment

Mar. 29, 2018—A patient’s mucus may predict the type of his or her chronic sinusitis, which could help doctors determine whether surgery or medical treatments can produce the best outcomes, according to a recently published Vanderbilt study.

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Study tracks impact of NAS on state Medicaid programs 

Mar. 23, 2018—In the United States, one infant is born every 15 minutes with withdrawal symptoms after being exposed to opioids before birth, according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics.

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New imaging approach offers unprecedented views of staph infection

Mar. 15, 2018—A new integrated imaging approach makes it possible to probe the molecules involved in invasive infections and can be broadly applied to any health or disease state.

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Study helps map signaling system in brain linked to ASD

Feb. 8, 2018—Researchers at Vanderbilt University have worked out part of the “wiring diagram” of a signaling system in the brain that has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

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Study finds higher death rates in poor neighborhoods

Jan. 18, 2018—Living in an economically disadvantaged neighborhood is likely to lead to death at an earlier age, especially among African-Americans, new research shows. The death rate is even more pronounced among disadvantaged individuals with unhealthy lifestyle habits.

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Asthma study may point to potential new therapeutic approach

Jan. 4, 2018—New findings from Vanderbilt suggest that blocking the migration of cells involved in asthma may represent a new approach for treating the respiratory condition.

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VIGH fellowship training program lands NIH renewal

Dec. 7, 2017—The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) has received a five-year, $4.66 million renewal grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue a program established in 2012 with Emory, Cornell and Duke universities that is training the next generation of leaders in global health research.

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Protocol reduces antibiotic use prior to cytoscopy

Dec. 7, 2017—A study from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) by Justin Gregg, MD, and colleagues demonstrates how a clinical protocol can help reduce unnecessary use of outpatient antibiotics.

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Research finds midlife women twice as likely as men to have asthma

Nov. 28, 2017—In childhood, asthma is more common in boys than girls. But around the time of puberty, that picture reverses. By mid-life women are twice as likely as men to have asthma.

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Study may point to new treatment approach for ASD

Nov. 16, 2017—Using sophisticated genome mining and gene manipulation techniques, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have solved a mystery that could lead to a new treatment approach for autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

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