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NSF Archives

Breast cancer-killing RIG

Dec. 13, 2018—A compound that activates a virus-sensing receptor has potent therapeutic effects in a mouse model of breast cancer.

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Vanderbilt’s Gavin Price receives NSF CAREER Award

Mar. 20, 2018—The National Science Foundation has awarded a Faculty Early Career Development Grant to Gavin R. Price, assistant professor of psychology at Vanderbilt’s Peabody College.

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Cell signals that trigger wound healing are surprisingly complex

Oct. 3, 2017—Vanderbilt scientists have taken an important step toward understanding the way in which injured cells trigger wound healing, an insight essential for improving treatments of all types of wounds.

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A new mode of DNA repair

Apr. 14, 2017—Structural details of a protein that removes DNA lesions shed light on fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair.

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Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart’s biomechanical properties

Feb. 22, 2017—Scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart’s amazing biomechanical properties in order to study cardiac disease, develop heart drugs.

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Softening tumor tissue could aid cancer treatments

Jan. 16, 2017—Tumors cause the intracellular material surrounding them to stiffen. Softening this protective layer could make existing cancer treatments more effective, according to new research.

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Targeting the “un-targetable”

Nov. 18, 2016—A novel drug that targets the protein RSK blocked aggressive breast cancers from metastasizing in an animal model.

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Bioluminescent sensor causes brain cells to glow in the dark

Oct. 27, 2016—A team of Vanderbilt scientists have genetically modified luciferase, the enzyme that produces bioluminescence, so that it acts as an optical sensor that records activity in brain cells.

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Cotton candy machines may hold key for making artificial organs

Feb. 8, 2016—Vanderbilt engineers have modified a cotton candy machine to create complex microfluidic networks that mimic the capillary system in living tissue and have demonstrated that these networks can keep cells alive and functioning in an artificial three-dimensional matrix.

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The yin and yang of COX-2

Oct. 2, 2015—New findings add to the understanding of how the enzyme COX-2 works, which is critical to the development of COX-2-targeted anti-inflammatory drugs.

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Targeting bone metastasis

Jul. 23, 2015—The rigidity of the bone extracellular matrix increases the ability of tumor cells to destroy bone, suggesting new targets for anticancer drug development.

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New ‘reset’ button discovered for circadian clock

Feb. 2, 2015—The discovery of a new "reset" button for the brain’s master biological clock could eventually lead to new treatments for seasonal affective disorder, reduce the adverse health effects of working the night shift, and possibly even treat jet lag.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

A diagnosis of cancer at any age is tragic, but during the adolescent and young adult years, it’s especially complicated.

Hope

A diagnosis of cancer at any age is tragic, but during the adolescent and young adult years, it’s especially complicated.

Karen Dyer Young cares for patients and members of the Dayani Center who have or are recovering from cancer or a stem cell transplant.

Momentum

Karen Dyer Young cares for patients and members of the Dayani Center who have or are recovering from cancer or a stem cell transplant.

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