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orthopaedic surgery Archives

Event provided free hand surgeries for uninsured patients

Aug. 15, 2019—Hand surgeons and other Vanderbilt Health staff offered surgeries to people who are uninsured and need surgical treatment for outpatient upper extremity conditions, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and ganglion cysts.

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More recovery, less disability focus of new musculoskeletal research center

Jul. 18, 2019—A new research center is aimed at improving patient outcomes and preventing disability after muscle and skeletal injuries and surgery.

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Rick W. Wright, MD, joins Vanderbilt University Medical Center as chair of Orthopaedic Surgery

Jun. 11, 2019—Rick W. Wright, MD, one of the nation’s leading orthopaedic surgeons and sports medicine specialists, has been named chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He will join the faculty Sept. 1.

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Keeping bone in its place

Apr. 11, 2019—Jonathan Schoenecker and colleagues have discovered a new mechanism for the formation of bone in soft tissues — a complication of severe injuries that causes pain and limits mobility.

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Protocol shortens hospital stays for back surgery patients

May. 4, 2017—Patients undergoing lower back surgeries had shorter hospital stays and fewer complications after a team at the Vanderbilt Spine Institute identified best practices for perioperative care and implemented them under a standardized protocol.

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Review highlights financial impact of sarcoma misdiagnosis

Dec. 10, 2015—Malpractice awards and settlements are eight times greater when physicians misdiagnosis sarcoma than when they make other mistakes, according to a review of 32 years of court cases.

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Boston surgeon recounts marathon bombing’s lessons

Dec. 12, 2013—Just before 3 p.m. on April 15, two bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Of the estimated 27,000 runners and 500,000 spectators present, three people were killed and 281 injured. Preparation, execution and teamwork — along with a large dose of luck — kept casualties to a minimum, according to Mitchel Harris, M.D., chief of the Orthopaedic Trauma Service at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

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Study finds limited resources for injured surgeons

Nov. 21, 2013—Nearly half of orthopaedic surgeons sustain at least one injury during their career and, in many cases, the resources available to them are inadequate, according to a Vanderbilt study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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