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Pampee Young Archives

Cellular engines of wound repair have distinct roles

Aug. 8, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered that, in contrast to prevailing dogma, fibroblasts are not all alike; instead, they have distinctive functions following tissue injury.

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Young named chief medical officer of American Red Cross

Jan. 4, 2018—Vanderbilt’s Pampee Young, MD, PhD, has been named chief medical officer of the American Red Cross.

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Surgical training enhances VUMC, Fort Campbell bond

Apr. 28, 2016—During a deployment as a military surgeon more than a decade ago, Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Tim Nunez, M.D., felt ill prepared to perform complex trauma surgeries for an Iraqi family caught in a fire fight, but he's now committed to helping military personnel become better trained for these types of emergencies.

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Healing without scarring

Oct. 16, 2015—Drugs that inhibit the Wnt signaling pathway can regenerate injured skin and may be useful in treating fibromatosis, degenerative joint disease and cancer.

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Boosting cell-based heart repair

May. 15, 2015—A metabolic change in adult stem cells makes them less “fit” for regenerative heart therapies, suggesting that strategies to prevent this response may boost the therapeutic usefulness of the cells.

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Kids more likely to react to blood transfusions

May. 4, 2015—Pediatric patients have a significantly higher incidence of transfusion reactions compared to adults, according to a study by Vanderbilt University researchers.

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Target for atherosclerosis therapies

Dec. 17, 2014—A newly identified “atheroprotective” gene is a tool for exploring plaque pathophysiology and may be a good target for therapies to slow atherosclerosis progression.

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Factor’s yin-yang tumor effects

Jun. 10, 2013—A factor produced by most malignant cells can both promote and inhibit tumor growth – an insight that is critical to using cancer drugs developed to block this factor.

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Long live the therapeutic stem cells

May. 17, 2012—Enhancing stem cell survival is key to improving cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine, and a new drug could help.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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