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pathology microbiology and immunology Archives

Study reveals new targets to inhibit pulmonary fibrosis

Oct. 4, 2018—In a study out this week in Science Translational Medicine, an international team led by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center sheds new light on the cause of pulmonary fibrosis and demonstrates a way to impede the disease in mice.

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Santoro to step down as department chair of PMI

Sep. 20, 2018—After serving as the department’s leader for more than 15 years, Samuel A. Santoro, MD, PhD, the Dorothy B. and Theodore R. Austin Professor and Chair of the Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, will step down from his role as the department’s chair after the completion of a national search to identify his successor.

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Healthy antibodies reverse diabetes

Sep. 13, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered that IgM-type antibodies appear to play a protective role to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes — and that purified IgM antibodies can reverse the disease.

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Research reveals link between immunity, diabetes

Sep. 13, 2018—When it comes to diet-induced obesity, your immune system is not always your friend.

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Link between immune system, disease explored

Sep. 6, 2018—The first Flexner Discovery Lecture of the academic year featured presentations by two Vanderbilt faculty members.

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Madhur, Smith set to deliver fall season’s first Discovery Lecture

Aug. 23, 2018—The Flexner Discovery Lecture series kicks off the academic year next week with presentations by two Vanderbilt faculty members. The Cutting-Edge Discovery Lectures by Meena Madhur, MD, PhD, and Scott Smith, MD, PhD, begin at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 30 in 208 Light Hall.

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Connecting an asthma gene to leukemia

Aug. 2, 2018—A receptor previously implicated in asthma may also play roles in other allergic diseases and in leukemia, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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Team finds potent antibodies against three Ebola viruses

Jul. 19, 2018—Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and their colleagues are a step closer to developing a broadly effective antibody treatment against the three major Ebola viruses that cause lethal disease in humans.

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New staph virulence factor

Jun. 28, 2018—Jun. 28, 2018—The new factor, an enzyme involved in host-pathogen interactions, may be a viable target for treating staph infections.

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Karijolich named 2018 Pew Biomedical Scholar

Jun. 14, 2018—John Karijolich, PhD, assistant professor of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has been named a Pew Biomedical Scholar by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

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A “public” target for HIV

Jun. 8, 2018—Common sequences of antibodies against HIV may be key to developing a successful vaccine strategy for the virus.

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New target to stop Ebola

May. 21, 2018—A new Vanderbilt study suggests it may be possible to develop antibody therapies or a universal vaccine effective against multiple Ebola virus family members.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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