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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Archives

Low oxygen and antibody responses

Apr. 25, 2019—Mark Boothby and colleagues are exploring the factors that contribute to antibody production and quality, which are key to our defense against pathogens and response to vaccines.

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Cancer prevention drug also disables H. pylori bacterium

Mar. 28, 2019—A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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Designing antibodies to fight the flu

Jan. 31, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators said their work shows that computational design can improve the ability of naturally occurring antibodies to recognize different flu strains and may hasten the development of more effective flu therapies and vaccines.

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Signals from the “conveyor belt”

Jan. 17, 2019—Vanderbilt researchers propose that cellular signaling pathways are amplified by a “conveyor belt” mechanism that exchanges active and inactive enzymes.

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DNA’s on/off switch

Jan. 17, 2019—DNA-binding “switches” represent a fundamentally new method of communication between DNA-processing enzymes, Vanderbilt researchers propose.

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New study looks at brain networks involved in free will

Oct. 3, 2018—Using lesion network mapping, a recently developed technique for analyzing how the brain works, Ryan Darby, MD, assistant professor of Neurology at Vanderbilt, studied free will perception related to movement decisions.

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Energetic gene switch

Aug. 30, 2018—New findings link flux through glycolysis, which produces cellular energy, with transcription and gene expression via histone modification.

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Predictive models for gene regulation

Aug. 16, 2018—Using new computational approaches to understand the behavior of cells should aid efforts to predict how mutations affect cell function and how diseases respond to drug combinations.

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Fueling the MATE transporter

Jul. 19, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers used spectroscopy to understand how a drug transporter pumps drugs out of cells, findings that are important for developing novel anti-cancer and anti-bacterial drugs that can overcome drug resistance.

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Understanding HDL structure

May. 3, 2018—Structural features of newly formed HDL particles will help guide understanding of “good cholesterol” and its function.

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Iron-sulfur “intersection”

Mar. 8, 2018—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered an unanticipated link between sulfur and iron balance, pointing to a genetic basis for iron-deficiency anemia.

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BOLD view of white matter

Jan. 12, 2018—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered that functional MRI detects neural activity in both gray and white matter in the brain, suggesting new ways to investigate diseases such as Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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