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Reporter Jan 9 2015

Inner ear keeps bones strong

Jan. 14, 2015—Alterations of the vestibular system - the part of our inner ear that controls balance - may contribute to bone loss related to both aging and space travel.

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Cognitive changes in ‘standing’ syndrome

Jan. 13, 2015—Patients with orthostatic intolerance – problems when standing – have cognitive changes, even when seated, compared to healthy individuals.

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Does fish oil help prevent A-fib?

Jan. 9, 2015—Growing evidence suggests that fish oil, thought to directly prevent inflammation, oxidative stress and heart disease, may have limited clinical utility.

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Cotton recalled as devoted teacher, mentor, scientist

Jan. 8, 2015—Robert B. Cotton Jr., M.D., professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University and former longtime director of the Division of Neonatology, died Friday, Jan. 2. He was 74.

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Study tracks combination therapy to treat melanoma

Jan. 8, 2015—Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer, with high mortality rates. While new drugs have been approved to treat the disease, patients nearly always develop resistance to the therapies and the cancer advances.

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Flu surveillance study tracks pediatric vaccination rates

Jan. 8, 2015—A study appearing in the January edition of Pediatrics, led by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, looks at how Nashville children ages 6 months through 5 years fared over 11 consecutive flu seasons concluding in 2010-11.

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Krause named Children’s Hospital chief nursing officer

Jan. 8, 2015—Kathie Krause, MSN, R.N., has been named chief nursing officer of Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

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Curcumin’s ability to fight Alzheimer’s studied

Jan. 8, 2015—One of the most promising new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease may already be in your kitchen. Curcumin, a natural product found in the spice turmeric, has been used by many Asian cultures for centuries, and a new study indicates a close chemical analog of curcumin has properties that may make it useful as a treatment for the brain disease.

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Patient education materials linked to electronic health record

Jan. 8, 2015—In recent months Vanderbilt University Medical Center has begun delivering patient education materials to patients and their care teams using a technology called Infobutton.

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Integrin discovery may lead to better lung treatments

Jan. 8, 2015—Vanderbilt University researchers have made an important advance in understanding lung development, which one day could lead to improvements in treating lung disease in premature infants and adults.

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Vanderbilt trainee on the front line of Ebola outbreak

Jan. 8, 2015—Rachel Idowu, M.D., MPH, spent five weeks in Africa last summer assisting the Ebola outbreak response in Monrovia, Liberia’s capital and most populous city.

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Trans Buddy program to support LGBT patients

Jan. 8, 2015—Fear of being stigmatized by health care professionals is a barrier for many patients who are members of the LGBT community — it’s one of the most-reported reasons transgender individuals do not go to the doctor.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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