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Undiagnosed Diseases Network Archives

Undiagnosed Diseases Network helps guide girl’s medical journey

Mar. 14, 2019—On July 6, 2017, the Krauter family of Hiawatha, Kansas, received a belated 4th birthday present for their younger daughter, Mady — a diagnosis for a host of worsening neurological symptoms that they first noticed when she was 3 months old.

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Counselors guide patients in interpreting genetic tests

Feb. 7, 2019—Certified genetic counselors (CGCs) are among the first faces that patients see once accepted into Vanderbilt’s Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) where hopefully they will gain a diagnosis.

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VUMC’s Undiagnosed Diseases Network site gains NIH renewal

Sep. 27, 2018—by Nancy Humphrey Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN), part of a clinical research initiative of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has been funded by the NIH for another four years. The new funding cycle began Sept. 1. VUMC is one of seven sites around the country selected in 2014 that will...

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UDN team strives to solve challenging medical mysteries

Jun. 28, 2018—Jun. 28, 2018—The anonymous man being discussed in a conference room at Vanderbilt University Medical Center used to be healthy and athletic, but has suffered from slow progressive muscle weakness for some time and now uses a wheelchair to get around.

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UDN program dedicated to solving medical mysteries

Mar. 2, 2017—It’s human nature to need answers. Patients with debilitating symptoms need a diagnosis — somewhere to place the blame, a starting point to search for answers.

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Vanderbilt is one of seven centers now accepting patients for Undiagnosed Diseases Network

Sep. 16, 2015—Eighteen-year-old Rachel Barnett of Robertson County is one of the first patients to be enrolled in the Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center — one of seven medical centers around the country participating in a clinical research initiative of the National Institutes of Health to identify rare disorders in patients.

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Vanderbilt selected to participate in Undiagnosed Diseases Network

Jul. 1, 2014—Armed with a $7.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Vanderbilt University Medical Center is one of six medical centers around the country selected to participate in a network to develop effective approaches for diagnosing hard-to-solve medical cases (undiagnosed diseases).

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

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