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vicc Archives

Vanderbilt: Laboratory for health care reform

Apr. 15, 2011—Vanderbilt University Medical Center is a laboratory for health care reform. Increasingly, Vanderbilt researchers are applying their expertise in informatics, genomics, drug discovery, basic science and clinical medicine to the solution of critical problems in patient care. Bedside checklists and electronic “dashboards” developed at Vanderbilt, for example, enable doctors and nurses to chart in exquisite...

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Soy foods not a risk for breast cancer survivors

Apr. 12, 2011—After years of confusion about the safety of soy food consumption by breast cancer survivors, a large new study found that eating soy foods did not increase the risk of cancer recurrence or death among breast cancer survivors. The study was presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting in Orlando, Fla....

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Cancer Center study snuffs out menthol myths

Mar. 24, 2011—People who smoke mentholated cigarettes are no more likely to develop lung cancer or die from the disease than are smokers of non-mentholated brands, a new study shows.

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Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center launches online genetic research tool

Mar. 3, 2011—A new online tool enables cancer patients and researchers to track the latest developments in personalized cancer medicine and connect with clinical research trials.

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Protein related to aging holds breast cancer clues

Feb. 1, 2011—The most common type of breast cancer in older women – estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) positive breast cancer – has been linked to a protein that fends off aging-related cellular damage. A new study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researcher David Gius now shows how a deficiency in this aging-associated protein may set the...

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Breast cancer patients with strong social network live longer

Jan. 31, 2011—Breast cancer patients who have a strong social support system in the first year after diagnosis are less likely to die or have a recurrence of cancer, according to new research from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Shanghai Institute of Preventive Medicine. The study, led by first author Meira Epplein, assistant professor of medicine, was...

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Jacobson to retire as leader of Vanderbilt University Medical Center; Balser named as successor

Mar. 30, 2009—Dr. Harry R. Jacobson will retire as vice chancellor for health affairs at Vanderbilt University June 1, and Dr. Jeffrey Balser, dean of the School of Medicine, will succeed him, Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos announced today.

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Vanderbilt biochemist receives 2009 Sigma Xi award

Jan. 29, 2009—Brandt F. Eichman, assistant professor of biological sciences and biochemistry at Vanderbilt University, has received Sigma Xi's Young Investigator Award.

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Southerners living in U.S. cancer belt; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers study causes of malignancy

Jul. 21, 2008—The South is known for many things: hot, steamy summers, iced tea laced with sugar and friendly people with a tendency to welcome strangers. But beneath the veneer of Southern hospitality and gracious living lurks a silent killer: cancer. Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have their own name for the southern region of the United States: the "cancer belt."

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President names Jennifer Pietenpol to National Cancer Advisory Board

Jun. 16, 2008—President George W. Bush has appointed Jennifer A. Pietenpol, director of Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, to the National Cancer Advisory Board. Pietenpol, the B.F. Byrd Jr. Professor of Oncology at Vanderbilt-Ingram, will serve a six-year term through March 9, 2014.

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Vanderbilt professor named chair of biomedical engineering

Mar. 26, 2008—Todd D. Giorgio, professor of biomedical engineering, has been named chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University.

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Racial Disparities Persist for Colonoscopy Screenings

Mar. 26, 2008—African-Americans are far more likely to be diagnosed with and to die from colorectal cancer than whites or other minority groups. Despite this increased risk, a new study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers found that African-Americans are far less likely to undergo colonoscopy screening than whites, even when both groups have a family history of colorectal cancer. The study was published in the March 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital with helipad

Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital with helipad

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