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Fishing for heart attack repair tools

Jan. 5, 2012—Managing myocardial infarction – and the resulting heart failure – remains a clinical challenge. To search for chemicals that can stimulate cardiac muscle cell production, Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology investigators led by Tao Zhong, Ph.D., Terri Ni, Ph.D., and Eric Rellinger, M.D., turned to a novel drug discovery tool: zebrafish. The researchers visually screened...

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Clues to flattened faces

Jan. 5, 2012—Mutations in the Jagged1 gene cause Alagille syndrome, an inherited disorder that affects the liver, heart, kidneys and facial structure. Patients with Alagille syndrome often have a prominent forehead, a flattened midface and a prominent chin; some have a cleft palate. To investigate how mutations in Jagged1 cause facial anomalies, Steven Goudy, M.D., and colleagues...

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Meds’ benefits differ in dialysis patients

Jan. 5, 2012—About half of kidney patients will die from heart disease within five years of starting dialysis, yet patients with kidney failure are rarely included in heart disease research. Jorge Gamboa, M.D., T. Alp Ikizler, M.D., and Nancy Brown, M.D., completed a small study that suggests a more personalized approach to selecting medication for heart disease...

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Green tea totals colorectal cancer

Jan. 5, 2012—Tea and its phytochemical constituents have demonstrated anti-cancer properties in cell and animal experiments – particularly green tea, which has higher levels of antioxidant polyphenols than other types of tea. Gong Yang, M.D., MPH, and colleagues evaluated the association between green tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk in participants of the Shanghai Men’s Health Study....

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Study uses art to spur patients to walk after surgery

Jan. 5, 2012—Following cardiac surgery, patients are encouraged to get out of bed and walk as soon as possible, a daunting task to many who may be experiencing pain or a reluctance to exert themselves. Protocol has cardiac surgery patients walk three laps around the halls of 5 South and 6 South of Vanderbilt University Hospital three...

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Johnson named VUMC Biomedical Informatics chair

Dec. 22, 2011—Kevin Johnson, M.D., M.S., professor and vice chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI) and professor of Pediatrics, has been named the department’s new chair after an extensive national search. His appointment is effective Jan. 1, 2012. Johnson succeeds Daniel Masys, M.D., who retired in June. As the new chair, Johnson will be responsible...

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Record number of VU faculty elected to AAAS

Dec. 22, 2011—Fourteen members of Vanderbilt University’s faculty have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) this year. This is the largest number of Vanderbilt fellows to be elected in a single year on record. They are among 539 fellows from around the country selected by their peers because of their...

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Informatics team creates gene app, wins national contest

Dec. 9, 2011—Members of informatics team have been recognized by National Library of Medicine for gene app.

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Exercise fights fatty liver

Nov. 18, 2011—Fatty liver, a reversible condition of fat accumulation in liver cells, can result from excessive alcohol consumption, obesity, type 2 diabetes, or metabolic disorders. Exercise can reverse this process, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are not clear. Because exercise is known to stimulate the action of glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels)...

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Skeletal defects in genetic disorder

Nov. 18, 2011—A new mouse model provides a tool for testing novel therapeutic approaches for neurofibromatosis.

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Averting a future oncologist shortage

Nov. 11, 2011—Providing increased mentorship, research opportunities and a nurturing, intellectual environment during fellowship training may help reduce a projected shortage of academic hematologists and oncologists.

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Balancing act in the gut

Nov. 11, 2011—Vanderbilt researchers have identified an antigen important to balancing the immune response to bacteria in the gut.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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