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Praise and gratitude equally abundant at State of Nursing event

May. 21, 2020—Like virtually all large meetings these days, the 2020 State of Nursing address was conducted via teleconference, on Zoom.

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Children’s Hospital lands grant from Hyundai Hope On Wheels

May. 20, 2020—Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt has been awarded a grant from longtime philanthropic partner Hyundai Hope On Wheels to support a COVID-19 drive-thru testing site at Nissan Stadium, home of the Tennessee Titans.

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Core principles guiding the COVID-19 response and beyond

May. 15, 2020—During a first-ever virtual leadership assembly necessitated through social distancing, Vanderbilt University Medical Center leaders answered questions about the Medical Center’s response to COVID-19 so far and what the future could hold.

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Telehealth transforms VUMC patient-provider connections during pandemic

May. 14, 2020—At the time Tennessee’s first case of COVID-19 was reported on March 5, direct-to-patient telehealth visits averaged just 10 a day at all of Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s outpatient clinics; less than a month later, outpatient telehealth appointments had skyrocketed to more than 2,000 per day.

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A salute from the Tennessee National Guard

May. 13, 2020—The Tennessee National Guard conducted a statewide flyover Tuesday, May 12, to salute medical professionals who are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Project seeks to help adults with TBI access social media

May. 7, 2020—With more than $2 million in funding, researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center are developing software to make social media platforms more accessible for adults with cognitive disabilities.

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Crucial donation

May. 7, 2020—Metro Nashville Vice Mayor Jim Shulman and Dena McCormick, vice president of Vanderbilt Health Purchasing Collaborative, pose for a photo after picking up boxes containing thousands of masks that were donated to VUMC by the Ferrell McDaniel Company.

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New method captures early viral-host protein interactions

May. 7, 2020—Researchers have developed a method to identify the primary interactions between incoming viral RNA genomes and host proteins.

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Study finds AI can categorize cancer risk of lung nodules

May. 7, 2020—by Tom Wilemon Computed tomography scans for people at risk for lung cancer lead to earlier diagnoses and improve survival rates, but they can also lead to overtreatment when suspicious nodules turn out to be benign. A study published in American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine indicates that an artificial intelligence strategy can correctly assess and categorize these indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs). When compared to the conventional risk models clinicians currently use, the algorithm developed by the team of researchers in a very large dataset (15,693 nodules) reclassified IPNs into low-risk or high-risk categories in over a third of cancers and benign nodules. “These results suggest the potential clinical utility of this deep learning algorithm to revise the probability of cancer among IPNs aiming to decrease invasive procedures and shorten time to diagnosis,” said Pierre Massion, MD, Cornelius Vanderbilt Chair in Medicine at Vanderbilt University, the study’s lead author. Currently, clinicians refer to guidelines issued by the American College of Radiology and the American College of Chest Physicians. Adherence to these guidelines can be variable, and how patient cases are classified can be subjective. With the goal of providing clinicians with an unbiased assessment tool, the researchers developed an algorithm based on datasets from the National Lung Screening Trial, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Oxford University Hospital. Their study is the first to validate a risk stratification tool on multiple independent cohorts and to show reclassification performance that is significantly superior to existing risk models. With IPNs, clinicians are often faced with the dilemma of weighing whether to advise a patient to undergo an invasive surgical procedure, which may be unnecessary, against a watch-and-wait strategy, which may result in delaying needed cancer treatment. A definitive diagnosis of an IPN can take up to two years. Better assessment tools are needed by clinicians as screenings for patients at risk for lung cancer increase. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and globally. The overall five-year survival rate is 21.7%, but it is much greater (92%) for those patients who receive an early diagnosis of stage IA1 non-small cell cancer. n

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PREDICT program expands, opens new Genomics Clinic

Apr. 30, 2020—A new clinic opening at Vanderbilt University Medical Center will help doctors and patients choose the best drugs for their medical conditions based on the patients’ unique genetic makeup.

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Rehab technique may help increase donor lung supply

Apr. 30, 2020—A new technique shows the potential to increase the supply of donor lungs by rehabilitating those organs previously considered too damaged for transplant.

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Adult Hospital adds K-9 unit for patient, staff, visitor safety

Apr. 29, 2020—Two Drug Detection Canines (DDC) are now reporting for duty in the halls and units of the Vanderbilt University Adult Hospital (VUAH).

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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