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immune response Archives

Immune defenses in asthma

Apr. 5, 2016—Vanderbilt researchers show that a certain factor negatively impacts the first-line responder cells in the lungs, providing one explanation for why patients with asthma are at greater risk for invasive bacterial disease.

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Melanoma response to immune therapy

Mar. 3, 2016—Melanoma-specific expression of a certain protein identifies tumors that are more responsive to an immune therapy.

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Immune tolerance in endothelial cells

Jan. 7, 2016—Inducing “tolerance” to bacterial toxins in the endothelial cells that line blood vessels may offer a new approach for preventing the negative consequences of sepsis.

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Tolerating a transplant

Oct. 1, 2015—A new genetic model has generated new strategies for promoting tolerance to transplants – and improving long-term transplant outcomes – in the background of autoimmune disease.

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How to trick a wily virus

Jul. 24, 2015—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered how human antibodies induced during testing of an experimental “bird flu” vaccine kill the virus.

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Immune response depends on force

Jan. 26, 2015—New studies explain how T-cell receptors use force to recognize and protect us against pathogens.

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Host sequesters zinc to control stomach bug

Nov. 21, 2014—Understanding how zinc and the host’s immune response control H. pylori’s cancer-causing potential could suggest new therapeutic strategies to reduce infection and cancer risk.

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Immune cell activity and melanoma

Nov. 6, 2014—The activity of a certain factor in immune cells is essential for an anti-tumor response, emphasizing the need to consider the effects of anti-cancer therapies on immune cells.

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Peptide quells “genomic storm”

Oct. 28, 2014—A cell-penetrating peptide developed at Vanderbilt blocks the signaling pathways that lead to lethal shock caused by bacterial infection.

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Immune cells’ role in hypertension

Oct. 24, 2014—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered that certain immune cells contribute to the development of hypertension, suggesting novel targets for treating the disease.

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Aspirin and allergies

Oct. 10, 2014—Drugs such as aspirin and indomethacin may increase sensitivity to airborne allergens by suppressing production of the signaling molecule PGI2, which in turn may offer a new treatment for allergies.

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Natural killer cells don’t clear HMPV

Jul. 23, 2014—Understanding how the immune system responds to the respiratory virus HMPV is crucial for developing vaccines and anti-viral treatments.

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