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infection Archives

Study identifies C. diff toxin receptor, suggests new treatment approaches

Jun. 4, 2015—Vanderbilt University investigators have identified a cellular receptor for a toxin from Clostridium difficile (“C. diff”) — the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States.

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Preventing early pregnancy complications

May. 20, 2015—The enzyme alkaline phosphatase may provide a new therapeutic option for women at high risk of pregnancy complications due to bacterial toxin exposure.

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Stuffed animals bring bacteria to OR

Apr. 17, 2015—Stuffed animals that pediatric patients bring to the operating room are a reservoir of bacteria that can be effectively sterilized in a household washer/dryer the day before surgery.

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Bacterial secretion machinery: 3-D view

Dec. 11, 2014—New structural findings reveal how "gatekeeper" proteins participate in the secretion systems bacteria use to infect host cells.

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Peptide quells “genomic storm”

Oct. 28, 2014—A cell-penetrating peptide developed at Vanderbilt blocks the signaling pathways that lead to lethal shock caused by bacterial infection.

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Defusing ‘C. diff’ infection

Nov. 8, 2013—Clostridium difficile (“C. diff”) infection is a leading cause of hospital-associated diarrhea, and the frequency and severity of infections are on the rise. D. Borden Lacy, Ph.D., associate professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, and colleagues recently demonstrated that the C. difficile toxin, TcdB, induces rapid cell death of human colon cell lines and pig colonic...

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Pregnancy promoter and protector

Aug. 23, 2013—Alkaline phosphatase enzymes appear to play roles in promoting pregnancy and in protecting the uterus from bacterial infection.

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Factor reduces virus-related asthma attacks

Apr. 26, 2013—An immune system factor associated with severe asthma may actually reduce asthma attacks induced by viral infections.

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PICU reaches new milestone in fight against infections

Feb. 7, 2013—On Jan. 10, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt reached impressive new territory — 365 days without a single case of central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI), catheter associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) or ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP).

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Zinc: a new antibiotic target?

Jan. 17, 2013—It may be possible to fight hospital-acquired pathogens like Acinetobacter baumannii by targeting the bacterium’s need for the nutrient metal zinc.

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Team creates new view of body’s infection response

Aug. 9, 2012—A new 3-D view of the body’s response to infection — and the ability to identify proteins involved in the response — could point to novel biomarkers and therapeutic agents for infectious diseases.

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Report shows Vanderbilt achieving low rates of central line infections

Jun. 28, 2012—Intensive care units at Vanderbilt University Hospital and the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt are achieving exceptionally low rates of central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI), according to a report released this week by the Tennessee Department of Health.

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