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mechanical engineering Archives

Paralyzed by accident, grad student engineers his future with exoskeleton

Feb. 26, 2015—Andrew Ekelem, who has used a wheelchair since a college snowboarding accident, brings an invaluable perspective to the lab of mechanical engineer Michael Goldfarb.

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‘Stretched’ cells promote cancer

Feb. 19, 2015—Mechanical stress appears to be a critical factor in activating normal tissue-associated fibroblasts to generate cancer-associated fibroblasts.

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Vanderbilt team examines human factors in nuclear power plant operations

Nov. 13, 2014—A multidisciplinary Vanderbilt team with deep experience in improving patient safety and technology usability has received a three-year, $800,000 Department of Energy grant to help nuclear power plant operators better perform their jobs.

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Brain surgery through the cheek

Oct. 15, 2014—Vanderbilt engineers have developed a surgical robot designed to perform brain surgery by entering through the cheek instead of the skull.

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Construction of new Engineering and Science Building at Vanderbilt set to begin May 2014

Apr. 28, 2014—Vanderbilt University’s Board of Trust has approved the construction of a seven-story tower on campus as part of an effort to further strengthen the institution’s growing reputation as a major producer of intellectual leaders, entrepreneurs and innovators.

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Robotic advances promise artificial legs that emulate healthy limbs

Nov. 7, 2013—Recent advances in robotics technology make it possible to create prosthetics that can duplicate the natural movement of human legs which promises to dramatically improve the mobility of lower-limb amputees.

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Vanderbilt Medicine: Robotics revolution

Sep. 11, 2013—In the foreseeable future, robots will be sticking steerable needles in your brain to remove blood clots; capsule robots will be crawling up your colon as a painless replacement for the colonoscopy; and ultra-miniaturized snake robots will remove tumors from your bladder and other body cavities.

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Newsmakers: Vanderbilt’s teaching, research and patient care efforts are making an impact

May. 6, 2013—These stories from the past year show how Vanderbilt is making an impact, on campus and in the world.

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Telerobotic system designed to treat bladder cancer

Apr. 2, 2013—An interdisciplinary collaboration of engineers and doctors at Vanderbilt and Columbia Universities has designed a robotic microsurgery system specifically designed to treat bladder cancer, the sixth most common form of cancer in the U.S. and the most expensive to treat.

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Humanoid robot helps train children with autism

Mar. 23, 2013—An interdisciplinary team of mechanical engineers and autism experts at Vanderbilt University have developed an adaptive robotic system and used it to demonstrate that humanoid robots can be powerful tools for enhancing the basic social learning skills of children with autism.

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Wearable robot helps man walk again

Nov. 1, 2012—  Amazing Vanderbilt research has designed a “wearable robot” that can be used by paraplegics to walk again. Vanderbilt’s Barb Cramer takes us on one man’s emotional journey to use the device, designed by Vanderbilt mechanical engineers, to take his first steps since a tragic accident. Read more here  

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Vanderbilt-led team to develop ‘microbrain’ to improve drug testing

Jul. 24, 2012—Creating a device out of human cells that simulates brain chemistry is the goal of a $6.4 million grant which is part of major new federal initiative to develop a series of “organs on a chip” designed to improve the drug development process.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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