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NIGMS Archives

Bacterial resistance breaks bridges

Mar. 14, 2013—Understanding how bacteria become resistant to quinolone antibiotics could guide strategies for developing new antibacterial drugs.

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Starting up protein synthesis, in yeast

Feb. 28, 2013—Researchers have found an unusual interaction between a factor that “turns on” protein synthesis and one that produces fatty acids.

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Antibacterial protein’s molecular workings revealed

Feb. 21, 2013—Vanderbilt investigators report new insights to the workings of calprotectin, an immune system protein that “starves” bacterial pathogens of the metal nutrients they require.

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Cure in sight for kissing bug’s bite

Feb. 15, 2013—It’s possible to cure Chagas disease – a deadly tropical infection transmitted by “kissing bugs” – in a mouse model.

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New view of DNA processing ‘hub’

Jan. 23, 2013—Structural studies reveal a new framework for understanding a central player in DNA processing.

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Seeing light receptor’s interactions

Jan. 18, 2013—Understanding how the main receptor for light interacts with other signaling molecules may inform new pharmaceutical development.

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Zinc: a new antibiotic target?

Jan. 17, 2013—It may be possible to fight hospital-acquired pathogens like Acinetobacter baumannii by targeting the bacterium’s need for the nutrient metal zinc.

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Polarity protein suppresses tumor growth, invasion

Nov. 29, 2012—The machinery that builds the characteristic shape of epithelial cells suppresses breast cancer formation and metastasis in a mouse model.

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Bacterial signals in sarcoidosis

Nov. 6, 2012—Study adds evidence for infectious agents’ role in sarcoidosis, an inflammatory condition that can lead to respiratory failure and death.

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Protein’s length, flexibility key to infection

Oct. 31, 2012—The structural architecture of the reovirus attachment protein is required for efficient reovirus infection of host cells.

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Proteins help flip tumor’s invasive switch

Oct. 4, 2012—Vanderbilt investigators have identified how two key components of cancer's invasive "switch" — the series of signaling events that turn on a tumor cell’s invasive behavior — work together.

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Cells with LIP eat their neighbors

Sep. 13, 2012—A transcription factor called LIP is capable of causing one cell to consume another.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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