Skip to main content

NIH Archives

Adhesion protein optimizes border

Feb. 14, 2019—Matthew Tyska and colleagues have found that an adhesion protein plays a key role in building the intestinal brush border that is essential for absorbing nutrients.

Read more


Study aims to change standard of care for laryngeal paralysis

Feb. 14, 2019—Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s David Zealear, PhD, has received a $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a clinical trial to study the effectiveness of bilateral laryngeal pacing in treating patients with a bilaterally paralyzed larynx.

Read more


Ehrenfeld’s LGBTQ health research lauded by NIH

Feb. 7, 2019—Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Jesse Ehrenfeld, MD, MPH, recently received the inaugural Sexual and Gender Minority Research Investigator Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Read more


Destructive ‘telegrams’ in asthma

Jan. 31, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators have discovered that certain microRNAs — "telegram"-like signals — increase after the induction of allergic airway inflammation.

Read more


New target for chronic kidney disease

Jan. 31, 2019—Preventing the formation of secretory structures that promote scarring in the kidney could offer new therapeutic options for a disease that affects millions of people worldwide.

Read more


Cell death pathway implicated in bone marrow failure

Jan. 31, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators have linked a specific form of programmed cell death to myelodysplastic syndrome, a type of bone marrow failure.

Read more


Nasal whooping cough vaccine trial underway at Vanderbilt

Jan. 28, 2019—Vanderbilt vaccine researchers are enrolling adult volunteers in a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored Phase II clinical trial that will study a next generation pertussis vaccine that may protect people from whooping cough.

Read more


Signals from the “conveyor belt”

Jan. 17, 2019—Vanderbilt researchers propose that cellular signaling pathways are amplified by a “conveyor belt” mechanism that exchanges active and inactive enzymes.

Read more


Pain relievers a risk for C. diff?

Jan. 17, 2019—A link between anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and C. diff infection suggests caution against overusing such drugs in patients at high risk for infection.

Read more


DNA’s on/off switch

Jan. 17, 2019—DNA-binding “switches” represent a fundamentally new method of communication between DNA-processing enzymes, Vanderbilt researchers propose.

Read more


Building a pancreas

Jan. 17, 2019—Vanderbilt investigators are defining the genetic programs that control the development of pancreatic beta cells — studies that could inform new cellular or regenerative therapies for diabetes.

Read more


Bile acids mediate metabolic benefits of weight-loss surgery

Jan. 10, 2019—A team of Vanderbilt investigators has pinpointed the role of bile acids and a specific signaling pathway in the positive metabolic effects of weight-loss surgery.

Read more


Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

more