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NIH Archives

Receptor’s role in nutrition brain circuitry

Jul. 3, 2012—New findings point to brain circuitry that communicates about the body’s nutritional status and regulates how nutrients are mobilized.

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Low oxygen could protect sick kidneys

Jun. 28, 2012—Low oxygen – and the activation of factors that respond to this situation – may be protective in chronic kidney disease.

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Probing the roots of depression by tracking serotonin regulation at a new level

Jun. 27, 2012—An interdisciplinary team of scientists have successfully tagged a protein that regulates the neurotransmitter serotonin with tiny fluorescent beads, allowing them to track the movements of individual molecules for the first time. This capability makes it possible to study the manner in which serotonin regulates mood, appetite and sleep at a new level of detail.

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Spelling out HIV risk in urban China

Jun. 27, 2012—Research reveals clues to HIV risk in Chinese men who have sex with other men.

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Kids’ cells okay after mom’s cancer radiation

Jun. 22, 2012—Study finds no evidence of increased mitochondrial mutations in the children of women treated with radiation for cancer.

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Gene database to aid disease research

Jun. 19, 2012—A new catalog of human genetic data may help researchers uncover the genetic roots of disease and enable the ultimate realization of personalized medicine.

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Roots of childhood brain tumors

Jun. 14, 2012—Cells in the back of the developing brain can give rise to brain tumors, suggesting they may be a target for treatment.

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Making order out of ordinal data

Jun. 12, 2012—A new statistical tool developed by Vanderbilt biostatisticians will help medical researchers make sense of a commonly encountered – but hard-to-analyze – type of data.

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Vanderbilt identifies genes linked to breast cancer chemo resistance

Jun. 11, 2012—A study led by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center investigators has identified a gene expression pattern that may explain why chemotherapy prior to surgery isn’t effective against some tumors and suggests new therapy options for patients with specific subtypes of breast cancer.

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DNA: From modification to mutation

Jun. 8, 2012—Understanding how an environmental hazard damages DNA may shed light on processes of tumor formation.

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Long live the therapeutic stem cells

May. 17, 2012—Enhancing stem cell survival is key to improving cell-based therapies for regenerative medicine, and a new drug could help.

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New clue to ADHD

May. 15, 2012—A rare genetic change adds support to the idea that altered dopamine signaling is a key risk factor for ADHD.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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